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MemberYevgenya Strakovsky

Research Focus:
The long 19th Century (Romanticism, Realism, High Modernism),
Education and the Individual (The Bildungsroman, autonomy, agency, citizenship, personality, character development)Methodological Interests/Interdisciplinary Ties:
Translation Studies,
History of Visual Arts,
History of Music,
Cognitive Approaches to Literature,
Graphic Design and VisualizationProfessional Concerns:
Humanities in Higher Education,
Public Outreach,
Arts Administration

MemberAlmas Khan

…Book project: An Intellectual Reconstruction: American Legal Realism, Literary Realism, and the Formation of Citizenship….
…University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA. Ph.D. in English, 2017. Dissertation: A Fraught Inheritance: Legal Realism, Literary Realism, and the Forging of American Democracy. Committee: Professors Marlon Ross (director), Victoria Olwell, Sandhya Shukla, and Frederick Schauer…

As an intellectual historian, I analyze how modernism in American law and literature has shaped the quest for equal citizenship. Drawing on my Ph.D. in English and my J.D. with a focus on constitutional history, I interrogate how creative forms of legal dissent – ranging from judicial opinions to lyric poems – have sparked constitutional reimagination in the context of African American, working-class, and women’s experiences. My current book project, An Intellectual Reconstruction: American Legal Realism, Literary Realism, and the Formation of Citizenship, construes legal realism (a progenitor of critical race theory) and literary realism as a major post-Civil War movements connecting disciplinary critiques to equitist politics. I have additional interests in British literary modernism and postcolonial studies, having composed articles on Joseph Conrad’s and Virginia Woolf’s texts. My literary and legal scholarship has been published in several anthologies and journals, including Critical Insights: Social Justice and American Literature; Critical Insights: Inequality; Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History; the Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry; and the Chicago Journal of International Law. Recent and forthcoming articles include “Black Lives Matter and Legal Reconstructions of Elegiac Forms” and “Applied Legal Storytelling: Toward a Stylistics of Embodiment.” I have also published widely on writing studies pedagogy through the lens of critical theory, drawing on extensive experiences teaching literature, law, and composition. My pedagogical scholarship has appeared in the Washburn Law JournalPerspectives: Teaching Legal Research & WritingThe Law Teacher, and the anthology Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn’t. When not immersed in literature, law, history, and philosophy, I explore modernist-inflected alternative music, fashion, interior design, landscapes, gardens, and other aesthetic phenomena suiting my fancy.

MemberVinay Dharwadker

Modern British literature; Anglophone literatures, Indian and South Asian literatures in English; World literature; literatures in Indian and South Asian languages (Hindi, Marathi, Sanskrit, Punjabi, Urdu); colonial and postcolonial literatures; modern theory, classical studies, comparative studies; poetry and poetics, fiction and narrative theory, novel and short story; planetary modernism and modernist studies; cosmopolitanism, migration and diaspora, postcolonial realism; literary translation and translation studies

MemberJacob Jewusiak

My first book, Aging, Duration, and the English Novel: Growing Old from Dickens to Woolf, is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press in December 2019. It theorizes duration and the conventions of realism through an analysis of representations of old age and aging, especially through the way novelists plot the development of characters over time.  I am currently working on a second book, The Aging of Empire: Networks of Dependence from Young England to Young India, which focuses on how the Victorians mapped a politics of age onto the asymmetrical relation between colonizer and colonized. This project demonstrates how progressive, linear models of imperial expansion derived their power from a tacit comparison to the development of a human life, entangling anxieties about the durability of empire with figures relating to old age and youthful inheritance.