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MemberMarina Gerzic

ECR based at UWA. Lover of all things Shakespearean. I work for the ARC Centre for Excellence for the History of Emotions (1100-1800) as its National Administrative Officer. I also work as the Executive Administrator for the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Inc., as the editorial assistant for the academic journal Parergon, and for the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at The University of Western Australia in both research and administrative roles.   My current research project examines popular culture depictions of Richard III, and analyses how these works interpret and visually embody Richard and his disability. My research explores and analyses the clash between Early Modern performance texts and youth culture/popular culture, in particular the appropriation of Shakespeare by youth culture/popular culture and the expropriation of youth culture in the manufacture and marketing of Shakespeare. I have taught courses in Shakespeare, film adaptation, and Australian literature. My doctoral work concerned millennial Shakespearean cinematic adaptations, specifically the intersection of Shakespeare and popular culture, as well as the function of music within these films. As well as the analysis of film versions of Shakespeare, I am also interested in how Shakespeare is adapted in new media, such as music, advertising, television, graphic novels and children’s literature. In particular, I am interested at how Australian authors adapt Shakespeare for children via a variety of forms and genres.

MemberAdi S. Bharat

I am a scholar of modern and contemporary French culture, society, and politics. While most of my research is focused on the contemporary period, I have experience teaching courses (or “modules” in UK parlance) on French literature, history, culture, society, and politics in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, in addition to Islamic history. My work is interdisciplinary, intersecting with cultural studies, literary studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, and diaspora studies. My primary methodologies are qualitative: discourse analysis, literary analysis, and ethnography. In addition, I occasionally draw on corpus linguistics approaches to aid my discourse analysis research.

MemberMarlo Burks

I work on philosophies of representation and aesthetics in literature, especially in Viennese Modernism and post-war German and Austrian literature. I am currently making revisions to my monograph, Troubling Art: The Aesthetic Encounter in Hofmannsthal and European Modernism and writing an article on poetological strategies in Uwe Johnson’s politically-charged Mutmassungen über Jakob for the Johnson-Jahrbuch. My next book project, Und die Welt hebt an zu singen: A History of Musical Mimesis in German Literature will survey representative examples of literature that try to describe music in poetic language — much like ekphrastic literature describes visual works of art. Tracing such examples from the Romantic Era to postwar Literature (e.g. ETA Hoffmann to  Thomas Bernhard) will result in a new narrative of German literary and cultural history.  

MemberKalpana Rahita Seshadri

My research areas are contemporary literature with an emphasis on Race and Animal Studies, and more broadly, analyses of power. My true love is for continental philosophy particularly phenomenology, Derrida, and contemporary critiques of bio-politics. Historical theories of colonialism and imperialism and the literature pertaining to British imperialism continue to provide, if not a foundation, certainly a disciplinary roof over my head.

MemberLucia Martinez

I work primarily in early modern English poetry and non-dramatic prose, with a focus on Reformation politics and poetics; my Master’s thesis is on Donne’s first Satyre as prosopopoeia. My dissertation is titled _Making a Solemn Note: The Music and Meter of English Reformation Psalms_.Current (and ongoing) interests include the lyric poetry of Sidney and Donne, music in Milton, family dynamics in Shakespeare, Spenser’s shorter works and letters, and the science of cognitive poetics. My spare time is occupied by my beagle, Boswell, culinary debacles, penning a DIY column for thehairpin.com, and my violin.BM, Violin Performance, Florida State University (2005); MA, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia (2007); PhD, English Literature, University of Pennsylvania (2014).

MemberKendra Leonard

Kendra Preston Leonard is a musicologist and music theorist whose work focuses on women and music in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; and music and screen history, particularly music and adaptations of Shakespeare; and a librettist and poet. She is the founder and Executive Director of the Silent Film Sound and Music Archive (www.sfsma.org) and the founder and manager of Shakespeare in Early Film (https://sheaf.hcommons.org/).