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MemberNicky Agate

I am interested in how various iterations of “openness”—including OA publishing models, open educational models, and open peer review, as well as open and transparent scholarly practices—might help foster a more inclusive, equitable, and community-oriented academy. I am co-PI on the Mellon-funded HumetricsHSS initiative, an investigation into the viability of a values-based framework for indicating excellence, and a founding editor of The Idealis, an overlay journal promoting the best in open-access scholarly communication. I serve on the editorial board of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication and the organizing committee of the Force11 Scholarly Communication Institute.

MemberRebecca Davis

Dr. Rebecca Frost Davis is the Director for Instructional and Emerging Technology at St. Edward’s University; her work focuses on the intersections of digital pedagogy and liberal education.  She is co-editor of Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, a curated collection of nearly 600 pedagogical artifacts with introductory essays for 59 keywords relevant to digital pedagogy to be published by the MLA in 2019.  Her recent publications focus on how the digital ecosystem affects teaching in learning. These include “Pedagogy and Learning in a Digital Ecosystem” in Jessie Moore and Randy Bass, eds. Understanding Writing Transfer and its Implications for Higher Education, “Redefining Learning Places in the Emerging Digital Ecosystem” in Deric Shannon & Jeffery Galle (Eds.), From the Abstract to the Quotidian: Reflections on Pedagogy and Place, and “A Pedagogy of Openness in the Digital Humanities” (co-authored with Carl Blyth) in Carl Blyth & Joshua Thoms (Eds.), Open Education and Foreign Language Learning and Teaching: The Rise of a New Knowledge Ecology (forthcoming 2019).  

MemberMartin Paul Eve

Martin Paul Eve is Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London. Previously he was a Lecturer in English at the University of Lincoln, UK and an Associate Tutor/Lecturer at the University of Sussex, where he completed his Ph.D. Martin specialises in contemporary American fiction (primarily the works of Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo and David Foster Wallace), histories and philosophies of technology, and technological mutations in scholarly publishing. He is the author of four books, Pynchon and Philosophy: Wittgenstein, Foucault and Adorno (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014: 9781137405494), Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future (Cambridge University Press, 2014: 9781107484016), Password (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016: 9781501314872), and Literature Against Criticism: University English & Contemporary Fiction in Conflict (Open Book Publishers, 2016: 9781783742738). From 2015-2020, Martin is a member of the UK English Association’s Higher Education committee. In addition, Martin is well-known for his work on open access and HE policy, appearing before the UK House of Commons Select Committee BIS Inquiry into Open Access, writing for the British Academy Policy Series on the topic, being a steering-group member of the OAPEN-UK project, the Jisc National Monograph Strategy Group, the SCONUL Strategy Group on Academic Content and Communications, the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Open Access Steering Group, the Jisc Scholarly Communications Advisory Group, the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation advisory board, the California Digital Library/University of California Press’s Humanities Book Infrastructure advisory board, and the HEFCE Open Access Monographs Expert Reference Panel (2014) and founding the Open Library of Humanities.

MemberKathleen Fitzpatrick

Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Digital Humanities and Professor of English at Michigan State University. Prior to assuming this role in 2017, she served as Associate Executive Director and Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association. She is author of Generous Thinking: A Radical Approach to Saving the University (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019), as well as Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011) and The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is project director of Humanities Commons, an open-access, open-source network serving more than 23,000 scholars and practitioners in the humanities.

MemberDerek F. DiMatteo

Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Gannon University. My research and teaching interests are in American literary and cultural studies since 1945, multi-ethnic literatures, higher education protest literature, American social protest literature, contemporary transnational and world literature, composition, and pedagogy. Former managing editor of Africa Today, a leading journal in the field of African studies published by IU Press. Former Visiting Lecturer at Indiana University Bloomington. I lived and taught in Japan and the United States at the high school and college levels. In Japan, I was very active in the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT), and my research interests centered on EFL pedagogy, authentic materials and activities development, and using literature in EFL. I presented on these topics at local and national conferences in Japan, as well as organized professional development at my institution. Outside of academia, I spend time training in jiu-jiutsu, cooking with friends, and catching up on pleasure reading or recent Netflix series.

MemberKatherine D. Harris

Katherine D. Harris, a Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature, and Director of Public Programming for the College of Humanities & the Arts, San José State University, specializes in Romantic-Era and 19th-century British literature, women’s authorship, the literary annual, 19th-century history print culture and history of the book, textuality, editorial theory, Digital Humanities, and Digital Pedagogy. Her work ranges from pedagogical articles on using digital tools in the classroom to traditional scholarship on a “popular” literary form in 19th-century England. She chronicled her teaching adventures in the March 2011 blog, A Day in the Life of Digital Humanities, along with 200 other participants which turned into a plenary address for the 2012 Re: Humanities and an article about the successes and failures of teaching with digital tools, “TechnoRomanticism: Creating Digital Editions in an Undergraduate Classroom” (Journal of Victorian Culture April 2011). Because of this work, Harris was named to the Council on Digital Humanities for the National Institute of Technology in Liberal Education and  co-taught a week-long seminar in Digital Pedagogy at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute, University of Victoria. In January 2012, she represented Digital Pedagogy as a panelist at the DHCommons pre-conference workshop, “Getting Started in Digital Humanities,” at the 2012 Modern Language Association ConventionHarris wrote about her pedagogical adventures over at FairMatter.com, a blog hosted by W.W. Norton Publishers. Her most recent article on digital pedagogy was published in Fall 2013 for Polymath. The latest experiment, along with co-editors Rebecca Frost Davis, Matthew K. Gold, and Jentery Sayers, involves open peer review, GitHub, and establishing a digital pedagogy collection of teaching materials, Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities along with the Modern Language Association. In keeping with her work in Digital Humanities, Harris chaired the California Open Educational Resources Council, a state-funded initiative to promote adoption of open educational resources textbooks in the University of California, California State University, and California Community College segments (113 campuses). After 3 years of state-funded work, that initiative has been converted to a program supporting adoption of OER materials on individual campuses throughout the CCC and CSU (AB 798 [Bonilla 2015]). The Council’s work culminated in a series of helpful OER resources:

Council members, including Harris, continue to submit journal articles to publicize their findings — the latest published article by Hanley & Bonilla presents initial findings based on surveys, focus groups, and a pilot project conducted on CCC, CSU, and UC faculty and students as well as the infrastructure of the CA-OER Council. In her scholarly adventures, Harris’ research on 19th-century British literary annuals resulted in a literary history of annuals: Forget Me Not: The Rise of the British Literary Annual (1823-1835) (Ohio UP, 2015), a monograph based on her articles, “Feminizing the Textual Body: Women and their Literary Annuals in Nineteenth-Century Britain” (Publications of the Bibliographical Society of America 99:4) and “Borrowing, Altering and Perfecting the Literary Annual Form – or What It is Not: Emblems, Almanacs, Pocket-books, Albums, Scrapbooks and Gifts Books” (Poetess Archive Journal 1:1). She created a legacy scholarly edition for the study of literary annuals, The Forget Me Not: A Hypertextual Archive, most of which has been re-coded into TEI and incorporated into the Poetess Archive Database edited by Professor Laura Mandell. Harris’ edited collection of Gothic short stories from the 1820s’ most popular annuals, with Zittaw Press (2012) was part of her plenary address at the Gothic Fiction Studies Conference in March 2012. Two talks that were offered during Spring 2014 at universities in New Zealand addressed some of the more interesting findings about the publishers, printers, and engravers in the business of literary annuals. In January 2013, she returned to her textual studies foundation with her presentation, “Echoes at Our Peril: Small Feminist Archives in Big Digital Humanities” at the 2013 Modern Language Convention in Boston, a talk originally given in October 2012, Scripps College as part of their Humanities Institute lecture series. In February 2013, Harris spoke at the Mellon-funded Digital Humanities Colloquium, Austin College. In Spring 2014, she returned to the road with  a talk focusing on the work of David C. Greetham at The Graduate Center, City University of New York being published in Textual Cultures 9.1 (2015). In Fall 2014, the travel continued with an invited talk on collaboration at the University of Alabama’s Digital Humanities Center and another on “archive” at the University of Tulsa, and then an appearance at the Modern Language Association Convention 2016 in Austin to co-preside over a digital pedagogy poster session. As of Fall 2019, her promotion to Full Professor and ensuing sabbatical have offered an opportunity to dig deeply into the intellectual representations of British Romanticism to continue to investigate moving beyond the Big 6 of this literary period. Her current project combines her work on SJSU’s “Deep Humanities” endeavors to conjoin Humanities and STEM curriculum on campus as well as continuing the commitment to publish in open access journals. She has spent the last few years on community-building through the Humanities, especially with her talk to the both the Book Club of California and the San Jose Museum of Art. To see her most recent and upcoming talks as well as the accompanying slides, check this page. For a full list of courses, syllabi, assignments, calendar, office hours, contact information, see Harris’ teaching page.