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MemberMariela Mendez

I am an Associate Professor of Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Studies and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of Richmond. My research engages comparative literary studies and feminist and queer theories to interrogate representations of genders and sexualities in print culture throughout Latin America. In particular, I address the various ways in which women writers have used the press to craft alternative spaces of cultural, aesthetic, and political intervention that disrupt heteronormative ideologies. I teach at the intersection of Latin American Studies, Transnational Feminisms, Queer Theory, and Feminist New Materialisms, and I am also interested in the political potential of a transnational feminist critical practice.

MemberTana Jean Welch

Tana Jean Welch is a poet and scholar of contemporary American poetry. She received her Ph.D. in Literature from Florida State University in 2013, specializing in medical humanities, American poetry and poetics, multiethnic literature, posthumanism, new materialism, and gender theory. She is currently Assistant Professor at the Florida State University College of Medicine where she teaches courses in literature, writing, and humanities and serves as the managing editor for HEAL: Humanism Evolving through Arts and Literature. Her critical work has been published in MELUSThe Journal of Ecocriticism, and Academic Medicine. Her poetry has been published in The Southern ReviewPrairie SchoonerThe Gettysburg Review, and other national literary journals. Her first collection of poetry, Latest Volcano, was the winner of the 2015 Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize.

MemberDB Bauer

DB Bauer is a PhD student in Women’s Studies, a graduate assistant with the Design Cultures and Creativity Honors Program, and a Digital Studies in the Arts and Humanities graduate certificate student at the University of Maryland, College Park. DB has a background in technical media production and has worked for PBS, public radio, and other freelance outlets. DB’s scholarly work focuses on the relationship between digital technologies and notions of the human, centralizing issues of gender, affect, embodiment, and critical or scholarly maker practices, specifically using 3D printing, and more recently, virtual reality. DB uses scholarly making to position technology as both research object and research tool. Areas of interest: digital humanities;  critical and scholarly making; 3D printing(new) media studies; speculative literature, art, and design; affect; gender performance and embodiment; queer theories; new materialisms; feminisms.  

MemberSerpil Oppermann

  Serpil Oppermann is Professor of Environmental Humanities at Cappadocia University, and currently President of EASLCE (European Association for the Study of Literature, Culture and Environment). She is also an active member of ASLE: The Association for the Study of Literature and Environment, serving on ASLE Translation Grants Committee in support of work in ecocriticism from international scholars to expand exchanges across cultures and traditions, as well as ASLE Mentoring Program. She has published widely on postmodern, material, and feminist ecocriticisms, and ecocritical theory. Her edited collections include International Perspectives in Feminist Ecocriticism  (with Greta Gaard and Simon Estok, Routledge, 2013), Material Ecocriticism (with Serenella Iovino, Indiana University Press, 2014), and Environmental Humanities: Voices from the Anthropocene (with Serenella Iovino, Rowman& Littlefield, 2017). She has also edited Ekoeleştiri: Çevre ve Edebiyat (Phoenix, 2012) and New Voices in International Ecocriticism (Lexington Books, 2015).  

MemberHugh M. Richmond

I head the U.C.B. Shakespeare Program which develops audio-visual/digital materials for the teaching of Shakespeare such as the video documentaries “Shakespeare and the Globe” (distributed by Films for the Humanities),and “Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre Restored” and “Shakespeare and the Spanish Connection” (both distributed by TMW Media). In addition to the above-cited web site, “Shakespeare’s Staging,” we have also developed Milton material, such as the documentary “Milton by Himself” (Films for the Humanities) and a website: http://miltonrevealed.berkeley.edu

MemberLaura Helton

Laura E. Helton is Assistant Professor of Print and Material Culture in the Department of English at the University of Delaware.  Her work on African American print culture, archival studies, and public humanities has appeared or is forthcoming in PMLA, Social Text, and Southern Quarterly. Her current book project, “Collecting and Collectivity: Black Archival Publics, 1900-1950,” examines the emergence of African American archives and libraries to show how historical recuperation shaped forms of racial imagination in the early twentieth century.

MemberPetra McGillen

Petra McGillen works on German literature, media, and culture, ca. 1750 to 1900. Her research focuses on material histories of intellectual and cultural production. In particular, she explores the impact of different forms and media of notation—from doodles to writers’ notebooks, from lists to databases—on writing processes and modes of knowledge organization. Her first book, The Fontane Workshop: Manufacturing Realism in the Industrial Age of Print (forthcoming with “New Directions in German Studies,” Bloomsbury 2019) is the first in-depth study of the unpublished notebooks and other “paper tools” of the great German novelist Theodor Fontane. Her other research and teaching interests include print culture, book history, and the history of journalism.

MemberTom White

I am currently finishing a monograph on late medieval manuscripts and their treatment from the medieval period to the modern day. ‘Potential Lives: the matter and materials of late medieval manuscripts’ explores the figurative, interpretive and theoretical possibilities of manuscript study, with a particular focus on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, vernacular romance, bookmaking recipes, The Book of Margery Kempe, The Book of Sir John Mandeville, and Thomas Hoccleve’s Series. Drawing on contemporary theory, this project also looks to position manuscript studies in relation to the fields of media archeology and critical infrastructure studies. I’ve published some of this work in the journal Exemplaria and some has also appeared on the Birkbeck Material Texts Network Blog. I also write on political ecology, renewable energy, and the role of visual culture in a time of climate crisis. A recent article on these topics–part of a new project tentatively titled Three Energy Stories: Humber, Clyde, Thames–appeared in the Open Library of Humanities. I keep a blog and write for MAP Magazine, The Trouble and the Glasgow Review of Books, where I edit an ongoing thread on ecology and ecocriticism.