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MemberAlexa Alice Joubin

Alexa teaches Shakespeare, performance, film, literary theory and globalization studies at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Her teaching and publications are unified by a commitment to understanding the mobility of early modern and postmodern cultures in their literary, performative, and digital forms of expression. https://chroniclevitae.com/people/1048183-alexa-alice-joubin/profile

MemberElizabeth Chang

Elizabeth Chang focuses in her research and teaching on the literature and visual culture of nineteenth-century Britain, with a particular emphasis on the cultural productions of the British empire during the Victorian era. Her monograph Britain’s Chinese Eye: Literature, Empire and Aesthetics in the Nineteenth Century (Stanford 2009) traces the cultural influences of Chinese places, things, and people, real and imagined, on the development of a modern British literary and visual culture in the nineteenth century. She is also the editor of a five-volume collection of nineteenth-century British travel writing from China (Pickering and Chatto 2010). Most recently she has published Novel Cultivations: Plants in British Literature of the Global Nineteenth Century (Virginia 2019), which takes up the role of plants as both setting and subject in the Victorian genre novel to argue for a reconfigured understanding of environmental agency in popular literature.

MemberCecile Tresfels

Sixteenth-century French Literature, apprehension, experience, curiosity, imagination and memory. Helisenne de Crenne, Rabelais, Léry, Montaigne, Marguerite de Valois. My research and my teaching philosophy are driven by the concept of “peregrinity”, which includes the other, the foreign, the bizarre, the curious or even the monstrous. I’m interested in how people, writers, travelers, understand and grasp the diversity of the world.

MemberLuna Najera

Areas of interest: Spanish and Latin American cultural studies (early modern and colonial); gender studies; second language acquisition; community engagement. Her journal articles have focused on early modern war, surveillance, gender, and other themes.  Born in Guatemala, she grew up in Los Angeles. She earned a Ph.D. in the Department of Romance Studies at Cornell University, and a B.A. from Hampshire College. Her faculty appointments have included Vassar College, Trinity College, University College Utrecht, and Radboud University (The Netherlands).

MemberBenjamin Fraser

…15): 275-91.

Fraser, B. “Madrid’s Gran Vía: An Urban Cultural History and Digital Project.” Journal of Urban Cultural Studies 2.1-2 (2015): 205-13.

Fraser, B. “Urban Railways in Buenos Aires: Spatial and Social Alienation in the Documentary Film El tren blanco.” Transfers: Interdisciplinary Journal of Mobility Studies 5.2 (2015): 5-22.

2014 (5)

Fraser, B. “Henri Lefebvre in Strasbourg: The City as Use Value in José Luis Guerín’s Dans la ville de Sylvie (2007).” Marxism and Urban Culture. Ed. B. Fraser. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books (Rowman & Littlefield), 2014. 43-61.

Fraser, B. “Sensing Capital…

Executive Editor Journal of Urban Cultural Studies Senior Editor Arizona Journal of Hispanic Cultural Studies Associate Editor Hispania Co-Editor Hispanic Urban Studies series

MemberChristopher Pexa

Christopher Pexa specializes in 19th and 20th century Native American and U.S. literatures, Native American studies, and settler colonial studies, with an emphasis on questions of indigenous ethics, sovereignty, and nationalism. He is completing a book, under contract with University of Minnesota Press, entitled Translated Nation: Rewriting the Dakota Oyate, that explores the ambivalent ways in which allotment-era Dakota authors played to white regimes of legibility while at the same time honoring tribal common sense and producing a contemporary Dakota nationhood. Pexa’s essays have appeared or are forthcoming in PMLA, čazo Ša Review, SAIL, and MELUS. He is also a published poet and is currently working on a book of prose poetry, entitled Throne of Horses, about the afterlives of Indian boarding schools.

MemberSookja Cho

I am an associate professor at Arizona State University’s School of International Letters and Cultures. I specialize in Korean literature and culture and in East Asian comparative literature. My primary focus is on the premodern period. I have a particular interest in subjects which reveal a heterogeneous but interconnected East Asian past, such as gender and religion, orality and performance, mobility and diasporas, and literary migrations. I am eager to represent the concerns and interests of colleagues and friends who teach East Asian languages, literatures, and cultures. As a member of the forum, I would draw upon my knowledge, skills, and experiences to facilitate and encourage dialogues about East Asia among scholars across disciplines. I would also like to improve the general audience’s understanding of East Asia’s cultural legacy as an essential part of our modern, culturally nomadic lives. With scholarship in the humanities under ongoing and increasing threat, I strive to voice our hopes of reframingthe role and value of humanities education and of exploring new approaches that benefit our humanities communities, including those that interface with artificial intelligence.