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MemberElizabeth N. Emery

My research interests include medieval and nineteenth-century French literature and cultural studies, the reception of medieval art, architecture, and literature in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe and America, early photojournalism, celebrity interviews, European and American writer house museums, naturalism, decadence, mysticism, cabaret culture, nineteenth-century French theater, the collection and study of Asian art in nineteenth-century France, and global food politics and sustainability studies. I teach a variety of courses from Beginning French I to advanced French language, literature, and culture courses with particular emphasis on the medieval period and the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. I currently serve as Book Review Coeditor for the journal Nineteenth-Century French Studies and as a board member of the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association.

MemberMarina Gerzic

ECR based at UWA. Lover of all things Shakespearean. I work for the ARC Centre for Excellence for the History of Emotions (1100-1800) as its National Administrative Officer. I also work as the Executive Administrator for the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Inc., as the editorial assistant for the academic journal Parergon, and for the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at The University of Western Australia in both research and administrative roles.   My current research project examines popular culture depictions of Richard III, and analyses how these works interpret and visually embody Richard and his disability. My research explores and analyses the clash between Early Modern performance texts and youth culture/popular culture, in particular the appropriation of Shakespeare by youth culture/popular culture and the expropriation of youth culture in the manufacture and marketing of Shakespeare. I have taught courses in Shakespeare, film adaptation, and Australian literature. My doctoral work concerned millennial Shakespearean cinematic adaptations, specifically the intersection of Shakespeare and popular culture, as well as the function of music within these films. As well as the analysis of film versions of Shakespeare, I am also interested in how Shakespeare is adapted in new media, such as music, advertising, television, graphic novels and children’s literature. In particular, I am interested at how Australian authors adapt Shakespeare for children via a variety of forms and genres.

MemberAlex Mueller

As a medievalist and digital pedagogy specialist, my work traces the public life of the English language within educational environments. During the Middle Ages, students and teachers worked from common books – often containing the Trojan texts of Virgil and Ovid – inscribed with Latin and vernacular marginalia that had been accumulating over time. The schoolbooks that survive from this era are so excessively overrun with glosses that it is often difficult to distinguish the texts from their commentaries. My work examines this sharing of textual space, which reflects an emphasis on collaborative and multilingual constructions of knowledge. On the World Wide Web, I characterize such democratic impulses as “open-source” movements. My research and teaching are attempts to apply the spirit of open-sourcing – the free sharing of computing source code – to the collection and dissemination of knowledge produced within the academy. The massive proliferation of social networks like Twitter and Facebook have demonstrated the power that digital compilations can wield, seemingly with little help from credentialed experts in higher education. Rather than turn to university-trained specialists for reliable information, the public is increasingly investing in the collective intelligence of the crowd, which digital databases such as Wikipedia are harnessing outside of the classroom with success never witnessed before. Yet, the same core principles of open access, free use, and collaborative generosity that inform these online projects have always been central to the work of the academy, even if they are sometimes hidden beneath the veneers of disciplinary specialization and avuncular elitism. Through my own research and teaching, I seek to peel back or make transparent these layers of exclusion to encourage a para-academic culture that interrogates and values the contributions of all parties, both inside and outside of the university.

MemberGeraldine Heng

Geraldine Heng is Perceval Professor of English and Comparative Literature, with a joint appointment in Middle Eastern studies and Women’s studies.   Heng’s research focuses on literary, cultural, and social encounters between worlds, and webs of exchange and negotiation between communities and cultures, particularly when transacted through issues of gender, race, sexuality, and religion.  She is especially interested in medieval Europe’s discoveries and rediscoveries of Asia and Africa.   Her first book, Empire of Magic: Medieval Romance and the Politics of Cultural Fantasy (Columbia UP, 2003, 2004, 2012), traces the development of a medieval  literary genre—European romance, and, in particular, the King Arthur legend—in response to the traumas of the crusades and crusading history, and Europe’s myriad encounters with the East.   Her second book, The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages (Cambridge UP, March 2018), questions the common assumption that race and racisms only began in the modern era.  Examining Europe’s encounters with Jews, Muslims, Africans, Native Americans, Mongols, and the Romani (“Gypsies”) from the 12th through 15th centuries, the book shows how racial thinking, racial law, racial practices, and racial phenomena existed in Europe before a recognizable vocabulary of race emerged in the West.   Analyzing sources in a variety of media, including stories, maps, statuary, illustrations, architectural features, history, saints’ lives, religious commentary, laws, political and social institutions, economic relations, and literature, the book argues that religion—so much in play again today—enabled the positing of fundamental differences among humans that created strategic essentialism to mark off human groups and populations for radicalized treatment.  The volume also shows how race figured in the emergence of homo europaeus and the identity of Western Europe in this time.   Heng’s third (short) book, England and the Jews: How Religion and Violence Created the First Racial State in the West, also with Cambridge, is currently in production.   She is completing a fourth book: Early Globalities: The Interconnected World, 500-1500 CE.     Heng is editor of an MLA Options for Teaching volume on the Global Middle Ages, and co-editor, with Susan Noakes, of the 40-volume Cambridge University Press Elements series on the Global Middle Ages, as well as co-editor, with Ayanna Thompson, of the Penn University Press series on early critical race studies.   Heng is also founder and director of the Global Middle Ages Project (G-MAP): http://www.globalmiddleages.org   For more of her work, see her Academia.edu page at: https://utexas.academia.edu/GeraldineHeng   Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}