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MemberJoseph Stadolnik

I am a New Haven-based student of medieval English literature and culture, and will be a 2017-18 Junior Research Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies, University College London.  I am currently working on a book project on the rhetoric of the sciences and vernacular literary culture in late-medieval England. I am also interested in manuscript studies and medievalism in the Americas. I earned a Ph. D. in English from Yale University in spring 2017.

MemberWendy Laura Belcher

African language literature (especially that in Gəˁəz, Amharic, Hausa), Anglophone African literature, early African literature, African film, African women authors, history of the African book, African manuscript cultures, African female saints, and queer African studies; as well as race and gender in eighteenth-century English literature, comparative African and European studies, postcolonial literature, Chicana/o literature, African American literature, comparative hagiographies, gender and sexuality, memoir, indirection and censorship, travel literature, manuscript studies, prison literature, intellectual autobiography, and supernatural monsters.

MemberTom White

I am currently finishing a monograph on late medieval manuscripts and their treatment from the medieval period to the modern day. ‘Potential Lives: the matter and materials of late medieval manuscripts’ explores the figurative, interpretive and theoretical possibilities of manuscript study, with a particular focus on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, vernacular romance, bookmaking recipes, The Book of Margery Kempe, The Book of Sir John Mandeville, and Thomas Hoccleve’s Series. Drawing on contemporary theory, this project also looks to position manuscript studies in relation to the fields of media archeology and critical infrastructure studies. I’ve published some of this work in the journal Exemplaria and some has also appeared on the Birkbeck Material Texts Network Blog. I also write on political ecology, renewable energy, and the role of visual culture in a time of climate crisis. A recent article on these topics–part of a new project tentatively titled Three Energy Stories: Humber, Clyde, Thames–appeared in the Open Library of Humanities. I keep a blog and write for MAP Magazine, The Trouble and the Glasgow Review of Books, where I edit an ongoing thread on ecology and ecocriticism.

MemberMelissa Ridley Elmes

I specialize in the medieval British Isles and North Atlantic World, with emphasis on Old and Middle English, Anglo- Norman, Welsh, and Old Norse/Icelandic languages, literatures, and cultures, alongside interests in premodern Irish, Scottish, and French literature and culture as well. I have a broad range of research and teaching interests, including Arthuriana; Chaucer; Robin Hood/outlawry; women’s and gender studies, particularly women’s literate practices; alchemy, magic, and esoterica; monsters and the supernatural; hagiography; literature and the law; genre studies in romance, chronicle, dream vision, mystic and devotional literature; cultural and historical literary studies (feasts and feasting; disasters and delights; violence and trauma; chivalry and courtliness; dreams and dreaming; landscapes and the environment; medieval afterlives); comparative literature; ecocritical and animal studies; manuscript studies/ text technologies and history of the English language. I am trained as an interdisciplinary literary historian, and as a scholar I am interested in the relationships between texts and the cultures that produce them, and invested in the ways in which multiple methodologies can be used in tandem to create a more focused and nuanced lens on a single subject. To that end, I make use of theoretical paradigms and methods from English, History, Art History, Anthropology, Culture/ Material and Gender Studies, among others, in my research and writing.