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MemberWendy Laura Belcher

African language literature (especially that in Gəˁəz, Amharic, Hausa), Anglophone African literature, early African literature, African film, African women authors, history of the African book, African manuscript cultures, African female saints, and queer African studies; as well as race and gender in eighteenth-century English literature, comparative African and European studies, postcolonial literature, Chicana/o literature, African American literature, comparative hagiographies, gender and sexuality, memoir, indirection and censorship, travel literature, manuscript studies, prison literature, intellectual autobiography, and supernatural monsters.

MemberTeresa Marie Hooper

I teach and study the entire Medieval and Early Renaissance periods, but I specialize in Early Medieval Literature with a focus in Early Medieval England, medieval manuscripts, and a little Late Antiquity for good measure. My areas of interest for teaching and research purposes include (but often wander outside of): Early English codicology; Old English language and literature; memory studies; LA/medieval cultural geography, cosmography, and travel narratives; LA, medieval, and Early Modern ethnography and exploration; early Latin saint’s lives; Latin texts in English translation; monsters and teratology; Chaucerian dream poems; Renaissance poetry; and Ancient to modern drama. My current research interests include the textual and codicological history of the Beowulf-Manuscript (London, BL Cotton Vitellius A.xv, part 2), the earliest Latin St. Christopher legend, and the OE and Latin versions of Orosius’ History against the Pagans. 

MemberJoseph Stadolnik

I am a New Haven-based student of medieval English literature and culture, and will be a 2017-18 Junior Research Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies, University College London.  I am currently working on a book project on the rhetoric of the sciences and vernacular literary culture in late-medieval England. I am also interested in manuscript studies and medievalism in the Americas. I earned a Ph. D. in English from Yale University in spring 2017.

MemberKym Weed

My research and teaching coalesce around the literary and cultural study of science and medicine, exploring the narratives that shape understandings of illness, health, disability, and embodiment. My book manuscript, “Our Microbes: Imagining Human Interdependence with Bacteria in American Literature, Science, and Culture, 1880-1930,” merges my background in microbiology and literary studies to examine the diverse representations of microorganisms in the years between the popularization of germ theory and the widespread use of antibiotics.