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MemberJay Paul Gates

…nd. Ed. Jay Paul Gates and Nicole Marafioti. Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer, 2014, 165–80.

“Imagining Justice in the Anglo-Saxon Past: Eadric Streona, Kingship and the Search for Community.” The Haskins Society Journal 25 (2013): 125–46.

“The Fulmannod Society: Social Valuing of the (Male) Legal Subje…

Old English/Anglo-Saxon Old Norse-Icelandic Old French Old Saxon Germanic Philology Historiography Linguistics Philology

MemberCristina León Alfar

…Macbeth’s Gender Trouble.”  Jx: A Journal in Culture and Criticism.  2.2 (1998): 179-207.

“King Lear’s ‘Immoral’ Daughters and the Politics of Kingship.”  Exemplaria:  A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies.  8.2 (1996):  375-400.

“Staging the Feminine Performance of Desire:…

I am Professor of Shakespeare, late 16th and early 17th century English Drama, and Women’s and Gender studies at Hunter College, CUNY.  My most recent book is Women and Shakespeare’s Cuckoldry Plays:  Shifting Narratives of Marital Betrayal, Routledge, 2017.  I am also an Editor, with Helen Ostovich, of the series “Late Tudor and Stuart Drama: Gender, Performance, and Material Culture,” for Medieval Institute Publications. My research and teaching interests include, Shakespeare, Early Modern English drama, gender studies, sexuality, political history, history of women, marriage law, parrhesia, feminist ethics. she/her/hers

MemberKatherine Hummel

I am a Ph.D. candidate in English Language and Literature and a certificate student in the Science, Technology, and Society program at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. My research interests include postcolonial studies, the environmental humanities, critical infrastructure studies, and environmental ethics. My dissertation, Ecologies of Infrastructure in Contemporary Postcolonial Literatures, seeks to incorporate the recent “infrastructural turn” from the social sciences into literary studies by examining infrastructure as an object that links together the historical spatial logics of colonial regimes with contemporary environmental issues, including resource scarcity, extractive industries, and nuclear proliferation. My project takes a comparative approach to West African and South Asian Anglophone novels published after 1989, and argues that a more robust attention to genre can help literary studies of infrastructure move beyond questions of representation. At Michigan, I teach introductory courses on writing, literature, and the environmental humanities.

MemberJason S. Farr

Jason S. Farr (Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 2013) researches and teaches courses in British literature and culture of the long eighteenth century, disability studies, gender and sexuality studies, queer theory, deaf studies, and the health humanities. His book, Novel Bodies: Disability and Sexuality in Eighteenth-Century British Literature (Bucknell UP 2019), examines how fictional representations of physical disability, deafness, and chronic illness shape the literary history of sexuality. Novel Bodies shows that Enlightenment authors employ variably embodied characters in their fiction to intervene in debates ranging from courtship to education, from feminism to medicine, and from kinship to plantation life. At the same time, these novelists, some of whom were themselves disabled, offer keen insight into the lived experiences of disability and non-normative genders and sexualities in the eighteenth century. Dr. Farr’s research has appeared in venues such as Eighteenth-Century Fiction, Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation, and the edited collection, The Idea of Disability in the Eighteenth Century (Bucknell UP, 2014). His public-facing writing appears in ProfessionThe Rambling, and The Chronicle of Higher Education. Before arriving to the Department of English at Marquette University, Dr. Farr served as Assistant Professor of English at Texas A&M University—Corpus Christi in South Texas (2014-18), and prior to that, he taught in the Literature Department at the University of California, San Diego. His courses routinely challenge students to think more expansively about disability, sexuality, gender, race, and variable bodies. Attuned to ongoing conversations about accessibility, he is constantly seeking innovative ways to establish more inclusive classrooms and communities. He has been hard of hearing for more than ten years, and his atypical experience of sound and speech directly informs his research and teaching practices.    

MemberChristopher Pexa

Christopher Pexa specializes in 19th and 20th century Native American and U.S. literatures, Native American studies, and settler colonial studies, with an emphasis on questions of indigenous ethics, sovereignty, and nationalism. He is completing a book, under contract with University of Minnesota Press, entitled Translated Nation: Rewriting the Dakota Oyate, that explores the ambivalent ways in which allotment-era Dakota authors played to white regimes of legibility while at the same time honoring tribal common sense and producing a contemporary Dakota nationhood. Pexa’s essays have appeared or are forthcoming in PMLA, čazo Ša Review, SAIL, and MELUS. He is also a published poet and is currently working on a book of prose poetry, entitled Throne of Horses, about the afterlives of Indian boarding schools.

MemberTyler Bradway

I am a scholar of contemporary literature, queer studies, affect, and experimental writing. Currently, I am Assistant Professor of English and Graduate Coordinator at SUNY Cortland. I am the author of Queer Experimental Literature: The Affective Politics of Bad Reading (Palgrave, 2017) and co-editor of After Queer Studies: Literature, Theory, and Sexuality in the 21st Century (Cambridge, 2019). I guest edited “Lively Words: The Politics and Poetics of Experimental Writing,” a special issue College Literature 46.1 (2019). My work has appeared or are forthcoming in venues such as GLQ, Mosaic, American Literature in Transition, 1980-1990, Postmodern Culture, Stanford Arcade, and The Comics of Alison Bechdel: From the Outside In.