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MemberCody Mejeur

Cody Mejeur is a PhD candidate in English at Michigan State University specializing in new media, narrative, queer studies, cognitive humanities, and digital humanities. Their work uses video games to theorize narrative as a living, emergent, and playful process that contributes to how we understand ourselves and our realities. They have published on methods for using games in pedagogy, gender and queerness in games, and the narrative construction of reality. They currently work with the LGBTQ Video Game Archive on preserving and visualizing LGBTQ representation in video games. They are a graduate lab lead in MSU’s Digital Humanities and Literary Cognition Lab and adjunct faculty at Ivy Tech Community College.

MemberDouglas Eyman

Douglas Eyman is Director of the PhD in Writing and Rhetoric, the MA concentration in Professional Writing and Rhetoric (PWR), and the undergraduate Professional Writing Minor at George Mason University.  He teaches courses in digital rhetoric, technical and scientific communication, editing, web authoring, advanced composition, and professional writing. His current research interests include investigations of digital literacy acquisition and development, new media scholarship, electronic publication, information design/information architecture, teaching in digital environments, and video games as sites of composition. Eyman is the senior editor and publisher of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy, an online journal that has been publishing peer-reviewed scholarship on computers and writing since 1996. His most recent publications include Digital Rhetoric: Theory, Method, Practice (University of Michigan Press, 2015) and Play/Write: Games, Writing, Digital Rhetoric (co-edited with Andrea Davis, Parlor Press, 2016). His scholarly work has appeared in Pedagogy, Computers and Composition, Technical Communication, Cultural Practices of Literacy (Erlbaum, 2007), Digital Writing Research(Hampton Press, 2007), Rhetorically Rethinking Usability (Hampton Press, 2008), Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities (Chicago, 2015), and Microhistories of Composition (Utah State, 2015).  

MemberTeresa Marie Hooper

I teach and study the entire Medieval and Early Renaissance periods, but I specialize in Early Medieval Literature with a focus in Early Medieval England, medieval manuscripts, and a little Late Antiquity for good measure. My areas of interest for teaching and research purposes include (but often wander outside of): Early English codicology; Old English language and literature; memory studies; LA/medieval cultural geography, cosmography, and travel narratives; LA, medieval, and Early Modern ethnography and exploration; early Latin saint’s lives; Latin texts in English translation; monsters and teratology; Chaucerian dream poems; Renaissance poetry; and Ancient to modern drama. My current research interests include the textual and codicological history of the Beowulf-Manuscript (London, BL Cotton Vitellius A.xv, part 2), the earliest Latin St. Christopher legend, and the OE and Latin versions of Orosius’ History against the Pagans. 

MemberEric Detweiler

I’m Eric Detweiler, Assistant Professor of Rhetoric & Composition in Middle Tennessee State University’s Department of English. I recently earned a PhD in English with a specialization in rhetoric and writing from The University of Texas at Austin. My primary research project focuses on the intersections of rhetoric and writing pedagogy, classical and contemporary rhetorical theory, and rhetorical ethics. In addition, I teach and study digital rhetoric and multimodal composition, especially as they relate to sound studies and sonic rhetorics.

MemberAllison Bernard

Allison is a Ph.D. candidate in premodern Chinese literature at Columbia University. Her research interests include the intersections of literary and historical writing, book history and print culture, and the world of Chinese theater. Her dissertation engages the literary world of Kong Shangren’s seminal play The Peach Blossom Fan, using the play and its network of related texts to examine ideological resonances among stage, society, and writerly legacy. Before joining Columbia’s PhD program in the fall of 2012, Allison received her BA from Middlebury College (2010) and an MA from Columbia’s EALAC department (2012). She also has interests in Japanese theater, poetry, art history, and media studies.