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MemberAdam Hembree

…University of Melbourne, ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions…

My thesis research investigates parallels between early modern English discourses on stage playing, ritual magic, and witchcraft. Main interests include early modern drama, philosophy of language, etymology, and the history of emotions. I also produce, perform, and teach improvisational theatre in the Melbourne area. Company website: https://www.soothplayers.com

MemberMarina Gerzic

ECR based at UWA. Lover of all things Shakespearean. I work for the ARC Centre for Excellence for the History of Emotions (1100-1800) as its National Administrative Officer. I also work as the Executive Administrator for the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Inc., as the editorial assistant for the academic journal Parergon, and for the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at The University of Western Australia in both research and administrative roles.   My current research project examines popular culture depictions of Richard III, and analyses how these works interpret and visually embody Richard and his disability. My research explores and analyses the clash between Early Modern performance texts and youth culture/popular culture, in particular the appropriation of Shakespeare by youth culture/popular culture and the expropriation of youth culture in the manufacture and marketing of Shakespeare. I have taught courses in Shakespeare, film adaptation, and Australian literature. My doctoral work concerned millennial Shakespearean cinematic adaptations, specifically the intersection of Shakespeare and popular culture, as well as the function of music within these films. As well as the analysis of film versions of Shakespeare, I am also interested in how Shakespeare is adapted in new media, such as music, advertising, television, graphic novels and children’s literature. In particular, I am interested at how Australian authors adapt Shakespeare for children via a variety of forms and genres.

MemberGenevieve Creedon

My research focuses on the ways in which narratives and discursive practices frame landscapes and shape human interactions with environments. I am interested in how individuals, institutions, and corporations use and participate in stories that foster affective connections to local, national, and international landscapes. As a comparative literature scholar working in the Environmental Humanities, with strong backgrounds in American Studies, Cultural Studies, and Animal Studies, I have focused my work on the nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States, while drawing on transnational histories, currents, and influences. This has allowed me to integrate my interests in environmental studies and narrative studies with my training as a creative writer in developing an inter-disciplinary comparative framework for examining how narrative and rhetorical practices structure our experiences of nature.

MemberAnna Shields

I specialize in classical Chinese literature of the Tang, Five Dynasties, and Northern Song eras. My particular interests include literary history and the emergence of new literary genres and styles in late medieval China; the sociology of literature; and the role of emotions in classical literature. My first book, Crafting a Collection: The Cultural Contexts and Poetic Practice of the Collection from among the Flowers (Huajian ji), published by the Harvard Asia Center, examined the emergence of the song lyric in a path-breaking anthology. My recent book, One Who Knows Me: Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid-Tang China, explores the literary performance of friendship in ninth-century China through a wide range of genres, including letters, prefaces, exchange poetry, and funerary texts. Other recent and forthcoming publications investigate emotions in medieval letters; the compilation of anthologies of Tang literature in the Northern Song; and the cultural influence of Tang dynasty anecdote collections. I’ve served as President of the T’ang Studies Society since 2011, and I am an editorial board member of the Library of Chinese Humanities Chinese-English translation series, published by De Gruyter. Before coming to Princeton, I taught at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where I served both as Director of the Honors College (2007-2011) and as associate professor in the Dept. of Modern Languages, Linguistics, and Intercultural Communications (2007-2015), and at the University of Arizona (1999-2006). I’m currently working on a new book that traces the shaping of the Tang dynasty literary legacy during the Five Dynasties and Northern Song.

MemberCecile Tresfels

Sixteenth-century French Literature, apprehension, experience, curiosity, imagination and memory. Helisenne de Crenne, Rabelais, Léry, Montaigne, Marguerite de Valois. My research and my teaching philosophy are driven by the concept of “peregrinity”, which includes the other, the foreign, the bizarre, the curious or even the monstrous. I’m interested in how people, writers, travelers, understand and grasp the diversity of the world.

MemberJoela Jacobs

WORK and EDUCATION I joined the University of Arizona as Assistant Professor of German Studies in 2015, and I am affiliated with the Institute of the Environment, the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, and the Arizona Center of Judaic Studies. I earned my Ph.D. in Germanic Studies at the University of Chicago, where I subsequently held a postdoctoral position as Humanities Teaching Scholar. Prior to coming to the US from Germany, I studied at the Universities of Bonn, St. Andrews, and the Freie Universität Berlin to receive my M.A. in German and English Philology. RESEARCH My research focuses on 19th-21st century German literature and film, Animal Studies, Environmental Humanities, Jewish Studies, the History of Sexuality, and the History of Science. I have published articles on monstrosity, multilingualism, literary censorship, biopolitics, animal epistemology, zoopoetics, critical plant studies, cultural environmentalism, and contemporary German Jewish identity. In my time at UChicago, I brought together an interdisciplinary community of scholars interested in Animal Studies, which turned into an on-going funded workshop and produced its first conference in 2014. BOOK PROJECT Currently, I am working on a monograph that examines a preoccupation with non-human forms of life in the micro-genre of the literary grotesque (die Groteske) around 1900 that begins with Oskar Panizza’s neo-romantic work in the 1890s, becomes a central element of modernism with authors such as Hanns Heinz Ewers and Salomo Friedlaender, and culminates in Franz Kafka’s unique oeuvre. This genre creates a field of artistic experimentation that allows for the transgression of categories such as species, race, and gender by introducing a non-human perspective on sexual and linguistic normativity. The vegetal, animal, and liminal human figures at the center of these grotesque texts challenge biopolitical measures of control through, for instance, their non-conformity with standard human language. This linguistic limitation is reinforced by the genre’s response to mechanisms of literary censorship, which resulted in new modes of expressing political dissent during modernity’s language crisis. One of these central strategies is the texts’ provocative use of grotesque humor vis-à-vis normative conceptions of what it means to be human, which also marks the genre’s distinct historical scope, as it perceptively critiques the rise of ‘the New Human’ from 19th century physiognomy to the wake of the Nazi rule. TEACHING I enjoy being in the classroom, both to teach the intricacies of German literature and language and to explore interdisciplinary connections surrounding fundamental questions about life and living beings with students. I have taught a wide range of courses on all levels of the German college curriculum and in adult education on topics such as German environmentalism, transatlantic perspectives on national trauma, (a)typical emotions in poetry, fairy tales, Kafka’s oeuvre, expressionist film, and German Jewish literature. As a certified Teaching Consultant, I am always happy to talk pedagogy and classroom technology.