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MemberMartin Paul Eve

Martin Paul Eve is Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London. Previously he was a Lecturer in English at the University of Lincoln, UK and an Associate Tutor/Lecturer at the University of Sussex, where he completed his Ph.D. Martin specialises in contemporary American fiction (primarily the works of Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo and David Foster Wallace), histories and philosophies of technology, and technological mutations in scholarly publishing. He is the author of four books, Pynchon and Philosophy: Wittgenstein, Foucault and Adorno (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014: 9781137405494), Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future (Cambridge University Press, 2014: 9781107484016), Password (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016: 9781501314872), and Literature Against Criticism: University English & Contemporary Fiction in Conflict (Open Book Publishers, 2016: 9781783742738). From 2015-2020, Martin is a member of the UK English Association’s Higher Education committee. In addition, Martin is well-known for his work on open access and HE policy, appearing before the UK House of Commons Select Committee BIS Inquiry into Open Access, writing for the British Academy Policy Series on the topic, being a steering-group member of the OAPEN-UK project, the Jisc National Monograph Strategy Group, the SCONUL Strategy Group on Academic Content and Communications, the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Open Access Steering Group, the Jisc Scholarly Communications Advisory Group, the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation advisory board, the California Digital Library/University of California Press’s Humanities Book Infrastructure advisory board, and the HEFCE Open Access Monographs Expert Reference Panel (2014) and founding the Open Library of Humanities.

MemberLaura Sanders

In addition to teaching as an adjunct for community colleges in Oregon and California, I currently serve as teaching learning center coordinator, online English faculty mentor, and community-based learning coordinator. I have taught composition and rhetoric at private research institutions, small liberal arts colleges, state universities, and community colleges. In recent years, I have served as co-editor of an accreditation self-study, interim grants officer, and academic department assessment coach. Combining my passions for professional development and social justice, I continue to seek the sweet spot between digital humanities and online community-based learning.