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MemberAnita Harris Satkunananthan

…Senior Lecturer, Postcolonial Gothic Literature…

Dr. Anita Harris Satkunananthan is a senior lecturer at the National University of Malaysia.  She possesses a PhD in Postcolonial Literature from the University of Queensland at St Lucia, Australia. Her research interests: Postcolonial Gothic, Phenomenology: Spatial and Temporal studies encompassing Hauntology, Geocriticism, and Memory Studies.  Anita has been awarded grants from the Centre for Research and Instrumentation, UKM and the Malaysian Ministry of Education. She has recently been working on Anthropocene literary criticism and ecoGothic literature — both subfields deeply connected to her ongoing work on the postcolonial Gothic and the spatio-temporal configurations of phenomenology in literature.

MemberMary Knighton

My research can be broadly divided into two areas: (1) 19th-20th century American and English literature, and (2) Modern and contemporary Japanese language, literature, and culture. Studies in global modernism and transnational exchanges bring these two fields together. Related research interests include feminist, postcolonial, and critical theory; the multi-ethnic literatures of the US, particularly African-American literature; the American South; Gothic literature; visual texts, arts, and culture.

MemberJamil Mustafa

I am Professor of English Studies and former Department Chair at Lewis University, where I teach courses in Victorian literature, Film Studies, and Gothic literature. My current and upcoming publications include book chapters on the poetry of Oscar Wilde, the Gothic fiction of Walter Scott, and adaptations of Jekyll and Hyde, together with journal articles on neo-Victorian representations of masculinity and the fiction of Ray Bradbury.

MemberCaitlin Duffy

I’m an English literature Ph.D. candidate at Stony Brook University. My work focuses on 19th century American gothic literature and contemporary horror films. I’m currently working on my dissertation, which traces a thread between early American gothic fiction and contemporary American horror films through the dual lens of 19th century American liberalism and present-day American neoliberalism. In particular, I’m interested in the ways that these two modes of reasoning depict what it means to be American, as well as the ways that 19th-century American gothic texts and contemporary American horror films challenge, support, and subvert these depictions through the deployment of repeated figures and environments. Outside of my academic life, I’m a podcast aficionado, tea addict, and novice yogi. Some of my favorite days are spent going to the theatre.