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MemberNesrine Chahine

Nesrine Chahine (PhD, University of Pennsylvania) specializes in modern Arabic literature in its global relations to European and non-Western cultural histories. Her book project, Marketplaces of the Modern, examines representations of Egypt as a marketplace in texts by twentieth-century Egyptian and Anglophone authors, arguing that unresolved narrative tensions over the commodification of laboring bodies, cultural artifacts, and raw goods reflect the troubled history of metropolitan influence in twentieth-century Egypt.  The project engages debates on transnationalism and globalization by emphasizing the necessity of recuperating the material dimensions of culture.  Her translation of selections from Ahmad Shawqi’s Death of Cleopatra has appeared in the Norton Critical Edition of Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, and she is currently in negotiations with the American University of Beirut Press for the publication of a trilingual volume in an anthology series on Lotus, the journal of the Afro-Asian Writer’s Union.  

MemberBryant Scott

I’m currently working on my dissertation, tentatively titled “Collateral Development Cultures and the Literature of Precarious States.” My research deals with literary engagements with the policies, practices, and social transformations of neoliberal development institutions. Focusing mainly on form and aesthetic disruption, I explore development as a mode of hegemonic, normative reason that imposes epistemologies and ontologies onto “developing” subjects. My dissertation argues that writers, particularly those within the “global Anglophone” tradition, have adopted new techniques to disrupt or “decolonize” the governing rationality of neoliberal development policies.

MemberNicole Rizzuto

Statement of Interest as Candidate for MLA’s Executive Committee LLC 20th and 21st Century English and Anglophone Literatures My interest in serving on the Executive Committee for Twentieth and Twenty-First Century English and Anglophone Literatures stems from my ongoing research within these fields and from my commitment to addressing the changing structure of the profession and its effects on knowledge production and scholarly activity. I take the current ideological and financial pressures placed on the humanities and literary studies occurring in the context of ecological and employment crises as challenges to be met on a number of fronts. I will work toward fomenting an inclusive atmosphere in the organization of sessions, panels, and other scholarly activities to encourage dialogue among all ranks of teacher-scholars across racial, gender, ethnic, sexual, and class identifications. I am interested in supporting a range of scholarship that foregrounds methodological debates about interpretative practices and ways of reading colonial, postcolonial, and neocolonial modernities; scholarship that reflects on the protocols of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary formations in era of an increasingly globalized and digitalized literary studies; and scholarship that considers how these debates, practices, and protocols are shaped by precarities emergent with the contraction of employment opportunities and resources for those working in the fields of twentieth and twenty-first century literatures. I will work to encourage the participation of graduate students, Early Career Researchers, and independent scholars in reimagining the intellectual landscape of the field and its professional practices. Finally, given the unevenly experienced effects of the climate crisis, I will support environmental humanities work that foregrounds marginalized perspectives while reconfiguring the boundaries of humanistic thought through engagement with social sciences, natural sciences, and science and technology research.

MemberWeihsin Gui

I am Associate Professor of English at the University of California-Riverside, where I am a member of the Southeast Asian Studies program, SEATRiP (Southeast Asia Text, Ritual, and Performance). I research and teach anglophone literatures from South Asia and Southeast Asia from postcolonial and globalizing perspectives. From 2014-2017 I was the contributor for Southeast Asia in the “New Literatures” section of the Year’s Work in English Studies. If you would like a copy of any of my journal articles or book chapters, please do not hesitate to contact me by email (weihsing@ucr.edu).

MemberSteve Mentz

Steve Mentz is Professor of English at St. John’s University in New York City. His work explores Early Modern Literature, Ecocriticism, Shakespeare, and the Blue Humanities. Most recently he is the author of Break up the Anthropocene, (U Minn P, 2019), and  Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization 1550 – 1719 (U Minn P, 2015) and co-editor of The Sea and Nineteenth-Century Anglophone Literary Culture (Routledge, 2016). He is a Series Editor for Environmental Humanities in Premodern Culture (EHPC) for Amsterdam University Press.