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MemberJoseph Paul Fisher

Joseph P. Fisher is the Executive Director of the Academic Resource Center at Georgetown University.  Previously, he served as Assistant Director at Disability Support Services at The George Washington University. He is the lead editor of the essay collection The Politics of Post-9/11 Music: Sound, Trauma, and the Music Industry in the Time of Terror, which was published by Ashgate Publishing in 2011.  His work has appeared in a variety of publications, including the website PopMatters and Hybrid Pedagogy. His current research explores the intersections of disability and athletics.

MemberKavita Daiya

Kavita Daiya is Associate Professor of English and Affiliated Faculty in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program and The Global Women’s Institute at George Washington University. In AY 2015-2016, she held the NEH endowed Chair in the Humanities at Albright College, focusing on Global Migration and Asia. She was Mellon Regional Faculty Fellow at the Penn Humanities Forum at the University of Pennsylvania (2014-2015). She serves as Associate Editor of the MLA-Allied Association journal “South Asian Review.” She has also been a Research Fellow at the Globalization Project at the University of Chicago.Daiya’s research and teaching expertise spans postcolonial literature and cinema, gender studies, globalization, peace and conflict studies, and ethnic American studies. Her current book focuses on ethnic migrations, citizenship, and gender in South Asia and the United States. She has written numerous articles on the 1947 Partition, South Asian literature and culture, South African Literature, gender studies, and transnational cinema, and her first book was published in the US and India: Violent Belongings: Partition, Gender and National Culture in Colonial India (Philadelphia: Temple UP, [2008] 2011; New Delhi: Yoda Press, 2013).

Daiya directs a Digital Humanities Histories of Violence and Migration initiative http://www.1947Partition.org. She has co-edited a special issue “Imagining South Asia” of the “South Asian Review,” and has been invited to present her work at the US State Department, University of Chicago, Amherst College, University of Maryland, University of Pennsylvania, Brandeis University, Georgetown University, and the University of Michigan, among others. Her research has been generously supported by fellowships from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Chicago, and George Washington University’s Global Women’s Institute and Sigur Center for Asian Studies. She serves as a member of the Board of Directors of The 1947 Partition Archive (www.1947PartitionArchive.org). In 2013, she co-founded the Philadelphia South Asian American Association.

MemberAndrew N. Rubin

Andrew N. Rubin is a Scholar in Residence in English and Comparative Literature and Critical and Postcolonial Theory at Georgetown University. His most recent book, Archives of Authority: Empire, Culture, and the Cold War, was published by Princeton University Press in 2012 in its TransNation/Translation series. He is also the co-editor of Adorno: A Critical Reader and the co-editor of The Edward Said Reader, as well as a forthcoming edition of Said’s collected works. He has written extensively on Edward W. Said, Theodor Adorno, George Orwell, and Joseph Conrad, and more widely on subjects such as the category of world literature and transnational modernisms for journals including Alif: Journal of Comparative Poetics, The South Atlantic Quarterly, The Journal of Palestine Studies, Arab Studies Quarterly, The Nation, The New Statesman, and al-ahram. In 2006, he was nominated by the B(R)ussel’s Tribunal Human Rights award for his essay in The New Statesman on the assassination of Iraqi academics and intellectuals. In 2007, he was the recipient of a Lannan Residency. He is currently working on a manuscript entitled Imperial Traces: Late Imperialism and the Terrain of World Literature, and has recently completed a monograph entitled Exiled in America: José Marti, Hannah Arendt, C. L. R. James, and Edward Said. More information can be found on http://andrewrubin.me.He has taught, researched, and written in the fields of Transnational Modernism, Twentieth Century Anglophone Literature and Culture, World Literature, Critical and Postcolonial Theory, and Comparative Literature.

MemberLaura Vilardell Domenech

I am currently (2018-) a Tenure-Track Assistant Professor at Northern Illinois University, where I teach Translation Studies and Spanish language and culture. In 2013 I completed my Ph.D. in translation and literary reception and I moved to Georgetown University to teach Language and Culture, as well as Translation (2015-2018). My main research area is the reception of translations, field for which I published a dozen articles so far. Nowadays, I focus my interests on the Spanish censorship over the translations into Catalan in the 1960s and more recently, I also study reception in social media of audiovisual content. My primary areas of study are translation and the history of publishing. More specifically, I specialize in literary reception, cross-border cultures and minority languages, with a focus on cultural studies and translation history. I make use of archives and field methods (e.g., interviews) in my research, and bring these methods and practices to the classroom when teaching Spanish culture and conversation courses as well as translation courses. My current work focuses on the censorship of translations into Catalan enforced by Spain’s dictator Francisco Franco during the 1960s. The goals are this project is twofold: first, to gain a better understanding of the means by which censorship prevented publications during this period. Second, to increase awareness of the forgotten publishers who suffered the pressure of the dictatorship and better understand how they continued to increase publications in banned fields. In this sense, I investigate how Catalan, that was prohibited in some of the public events and also at school, was kept alive thanks to translations into this language. I have been part of four research and development projects; two from the Catalan Government, (2009-2012 and 2014-2017) and two from the Ministry of Science and Innovation (2008-2011 and 2011-2014). I recently earned a grant (Institució de les Lletres Catalanes, Generalitat de Catalunya) to write a book about Josep M. Boix i Selva, director of Vergara Publishing House, focusing on the publishing house’s series of translations into Catalan (“Isard”) and its troubles with censorship.

MemberAnna Sagal

…MA, English & American Literature, Georgetown University
PhD, English, Tufts University…

I have two ongoing research projects. The first, entitled Resisting Gardens: Pedagogy & Natural History in Eighteenth-Century Women’s Literature, examines a selection of works of literature and art by women that engage with scientific subjects; genres include periodicals, textbooks, paper mosaics (collages), paintings, and conduct of life works. Utilizing the framework of critical plant studies, this project makes the argument for a radical tradition of women’s naturalist labor that challenges prevailing models of human-nature dynamics. I have also begun preliminary research on a second project, Flora Abroad: Eighteenth-Century Women and Colonial Botany. While still in its early conceptual stages, this project traces the intellectual and artistic productions of women who studied the natural world in the Caribbean, America, Canada, and other European colonies.

MemberCatherine Marie Jaffe

…B.A. 1980, Georgetown University, Honors English

M.A. 1981, University of Chicago, Comparative Literature

Ph. D. 1986, University of Chicago, Comparative Literature (“The Reader in the Modern Lyric Poem: Juan Ramón Jiménez, Fernando Pessoa, and W. B. Yeats,” dissertation director: Ricardo Gullón)…

Catherine M. Jaffe is Professor of Spanish at Texas State University, where she  also teaches in the Honors College Interdisciplinary Humanities Program. She is on the MLA Forum 18th-19thC Spanish and Iberian LLC Executive Committee (2017-2022) and serves on the editorial boards of Dieciocho: Hispanic Enlightenment and Oxford University Studies in the Enlightnement. Catherine Jaffe’s research interests in modern Spanish and comparative literature focus on women writers and theories of gender and reading in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Spain. Her publications include studies of quixotism, gender and translation, and feminism in the Hispanic Enlightenment.