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MemberElizabeth Cruz Petersen

Elizabeth Cruz Petersen, Ph.D., holds a Fellow position at the Center for Body, Mind, and Culture at Florida Atlantic University, and an adjunct faculty position in the Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature. Her research is at the crossroads of cognitive studies (specifically somaesthetics) and early modern Spanish theater and literature. Focusing on the relationship between body, mind, and environment in the context of early modern Spanish performance, her book Women’s Somatic Training in Early Modern Spanish Theater (Routledge, 2016) demonstrates how the early modern Spanish actress subscribed to various somatic practices in an effort to prepare for a role. She is currently working on two research projects: The lives of five women in early modern Spanish Theater who started and ran their own theater enterprises, directing and mentoring another generation of young women entrepreneurs; and the transformation of the witch throughout literary history.

MemberCharlie Gleek

…Ph.D (anticipated in 2020) Comparative Studies: Cultures, Languages & Literatures, Florida Atlantic University.
Ed.D. (2014) Educational Leadership, Lynn University.
M.A. (2004) Political Science, Florida Atlantic University.
B.A. (2002) Political Science, Florida Atlantic University….

Charlie Gleek is a Ph.D. candidate in the Comparative Studies Program at Florida Atlantic University, under the direction of Dr. Taylor Hagood. Overtly interdisciplinary by training, Charlie’s scholarly concentration focuses on the print culture of southern literature during the late-capitalist period. His dissertation project, “Southern Fringes: The Role of Paratext in Larry Brown’s Short Fiction,” demonstrates how paratext points to the material and social conditions that make Brown’s short stories possible, which in turn, provides a context for understanding southern literature and culture. Charlie’s recently published work appears in Penumbra: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Critical Inquiry, i.e.: inquiry in education, and on Humanities Commons. Charlie’s most recent teaching experience includes undergraduate courses in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters’ Interdisciplinary Studies program, the Department of English, and the Department of History. Charlie also works as a Program Assistant in the College’s School of Interdisciplinary Studies Charlie Gleek is a veteran academic professional with more than fifteen years of research, classroom, and administrative experience in universities, secondary schools, not-for-profit, and professional organizations around the world. On the job market for the 2020-21 academic year, Charlie is looking to work in collaborative scholarly environments: from arts-focused, early-collegiate, or globally-oriented secondary educational institutions to university departments with innovative American Studies, Ethnic and Multicultural Studies, English and Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies programs. Current versions of Charlie’s application materials are available upon request. Charlie’s range of interests and experiences fall well outside academia. A musician since childhood, he toured internationally and recorded as a member of the American Boychoir under the direction of James Litton. Charlie’s contemporary musical projects, recordings, and performances in warehouses and homes, bars and pubs, to dedicated concert venues and summer touring festivals, spans more than three decades of work, including his current role as drummer and bassist in bands made up of Florida Atlantic University College of Arts and Letters faculty members. Before coming to academia, Charlie worked as a landscaper, on loading docks, and in warehouses, on retail floors, and as a line cook: working-class experiences that inform both his scholarship and pedagogy. Charlie lives with his wife Kate Schmitt, their two daughters, and their dog Maddie in Boca Raton, FL.

MemberStacey Balkan

Stacey Balkan is assistant professor of Environmental Literature and Humanities at Florida Atlantic University.  Her research focuses on postcolonial ecologies and the politics of representation in the Global South; landscape aesthetics and counter-pastoralism; Anthropocene studies; radical materialism; and environmental justice.  Stacey’s recent articles for The Global South and ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment examine the legacy of uneven and combined development in Nigeria and India; and she is now at work on two book-length manuscripts–Rogues in the Postcolony: Developing Itinerancy in India and Oil Fictions: World Literature and our Contemporary Petrosphere. Critiquing development policies in colonial and postcolonial India, Rogues in the Postcolony  foregrounds the intersection(s) between landscape ideology, agricultural improvement, and historical trauma as each obtains in British-occupied Bengal, post- independence Mumbai and New Delhi, and late-capitalist Bhopal. From the transformation of commonly held land for agriculture, whether in the form of plantation regimes or contemporary agribusiness, to the emergent slum ecologies of India’s premier urban enclaves, modern improvement schemes have hinged on the removal of figures who have lately found expression in novels that replace the neoliberal fictions of the “new India” with the itinerant narratives of the postcolonial pícaro. These stories constitute what Balkan calls an “aesthetics of indigence,” which brings into sharp focus what picaresque enthusiasts have long characterized as la vida buscóna–translated loosely as the “low life” of the working-class protagonist. Stacey is also co-editing a forthcoming collection entitled Oil Fictions: World literature and our Contemporary Petrosphere–an anthology situated within the emergent field of Petrocultures. Oil Fictions presents an attempt to grapple with the pervasiveness of this often-invisible biocultural agent through the cultivation of a robust petro-aesthetic practice. Her recent work also includes essays on the Anthropocene and its relationship to Empire for Global South Studies and Public Books; and her earlier research, born of several years teaching Contemporary Latin American Literature and Anglophone World Literature at Bergen Community College in New Jersey, has been published in The Cambridge Companion to Comparative Literature, World Literature and Comparative Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature and Culture.  At BCC, she also served as the co-director of the college’s Literary Arts Series and as a fellow for the Center for Peace, Justice, and Reconciliation.

MemberAlexander Gil

Alex Gil is Digital Scholarship Librarian at Columbia University Libraries. He collaborates with faculty, students and library professionals leveraging computational and network technologies in humanities research, pedagogy and scholarly communications. He curates the Studio@Butler at Columbia University, a tech-light library innovation space focused on digital scholarship and pedagogy; he is founder and faculty moderator of Columbia’s Group for Experimental Methods in the Humanities, a vibrant trans-disciplinary research cluster focused on experimental humanities; senior editor of sx archipelagos, a journal of Caribbean Digital Studies, and co-wrangler of The Caribbean Digital conference series. Current projects include Ed, a digital platform for minimal editions of literary texts; Aimé Césaire and The Broken Record, a minimal computing experiment in long-form digital scholarship; and, In The Same Boats, a visualization of trans-Atlantic intersections of black intellectuals in the 20th century.