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MemberFrantiska Zezulakova Schormova

Normal 0 21 false false false CS X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Normální tabulka”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} I am a fellow of Centre français de recherche en sciences sociales and a PhD student of American Literature at Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic.  My main field is African-American literature (especially in the Cold War/ decolonization period), but I am also interested in the ways culture travels, transnational social movements, and various forms of internationalisms and anti-racist imaginaries. My title of my dissertation is “African American Poets Abroad: Black and Red Allegiances in Early Cold War Czechoslovakia.“ I also translate and review (mainly) US literature. In 2017/2018, I was a Fulbright scholarship holder and a fellow of Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University. My other research stay include a semester-long KAAD scholarship at Free University Berlin and a month at the University of Oxford (EUROPAEUM scholarship).

MemberElissa Myers

I work on nineteenth-century women authors, children’s literature, juvenilia and texts written by children, periodicals, needlework and other craft forms, and material culture. Recent course offerings include a Literary History class entitled “Women’s Literary Traditions,” a Writing about Literature (English 130) class themed “The Gothic,” and a Literature and Place class themed “Global Victorians.” Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} My dissertation, Crafting Nineteenth-Century Girlhoods, examines nineteenth-century educational crafting in charity schools, mission schools, and boarding schools in Britain and America. I argue that crafting in these schools often aimed to rigidly structure girls’ outer lives in order to eradicate their inner lives and cultural and religious identities. I will examine girls’ work in craft forms and representations of crafts in literature–including needlework samplers and manuscript and printed periodicals—in order to assess how girls might have used these very craft forms to resist such oppressive pedagogical techniques. 

MemberLucia Martinez

I work primarily in early modern English poetry and non-dramatic prose, with a focus on Reformation politics and poetics; my Master’s thesis is on Donne’s first Satyre as prosopopoeia. My dissertation is titled _Making a Solemn Note: The Music and Meter of English Reformation Psalms_.Current (and ongoing) interests include the lyric poetry of Sidney and Donne, music in Milton, family dynamics in Shakespeare, Spenser’s shorter works and letters, and the science of cognitive poetics. My spare time is occupied by my beagle, Boswell, culinary debacles, penning a DIY column for thehairpin.com, and my violin.BM, Violin Performance, Florida State University (2005); MA, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia (2007); PhD, English Literature, University of Pennsylvania (2014).

MemberJ.D. Schnepf

I am currently a postdoctoral lecturer at Princeton University. I also co-chair the Novel Theory Seminar at the Mahindra Humanities Center and am a member of the Doing Science Through Literature (DSL) team at Yale University. This year I am also a recipient of a Princeton University Committee on Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences Grant. While completing my PhD, I was appointed Visiting Instructor of Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century American Literature in the English Department at Connecticut College. I received my PhD from the Department of English at Brown University in 2014. My scholarship and teaching has been generously supported by the Huntington Library, the Christopher Isherwood Foundation, the English Institute, the Elson Family Arts Fund, the Harvard University Provostial Fund, and other fellowship-granting institutions.

MemberKimberly K. Dougherty

My writing and research examine the representation of airpower and the human costs of airpower employment in twentieth and twenty-first century literature. My interests blend  my first career as a USAF Officer and aviator with my newest career teaching and writing about literature. After twenty-two years as a KC-135 navigator, conducting in-flight refueling with other aircraft and flying combat missions over Afghanistan, I returned to my first love, literature.  I currently teach American Lit, Multi-ethnic Lit, and Intro to Lit.  I’m developing a course on Contemporary War Writing for 2019. I recently co-facilitated two sessions of “From Troy to Baghdad: Dialogues on the Experience of War and Homecoming” for the New Hampshire Humanities.  In this group, veterans and their families read and discussed The Odyssey as a springboard to discover their own truths about combat trauma, personal sacrifice, and readjustment.

MemberKarin Anneliese Wurst

Karin A. Wurst, is Professor of German Literature and Culture. She received her Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. Her books have focused on representations of the family, women’s drama, cultural consumption in 18th Century-Germany, and J.M.R. Lenz : Das Schlaraffenland verwilderter Ideen. Narrative Strategien in den Prosaerzählungen von J. M. R. Lenz (Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2014); Fabricating Pleasure: Fashion, Entertainment, and Consumption in Germany (1780-1830), German Literary Theory and Cultural Studies (Wayne State University Press, 2005). Karin A. Wurst and Alan Leidner, Unpopular Virtues: J. M. R. Lenz and the Critics. A Reception History (Columbia, S.C.: Camden House, 1999). Edited and introduced Eleonore Thon’s “Adelheit von Rastenberg.” Texts and Translation Series. (New York: MLA, 1996). Edited and introduced J.M.R. Lenz als Alternative? Positionsanalysen zum 200. Todestag (Köln, Wien, Weimar: Böhlau, 1992). Frau und Drama im achtzehnten Jahrhundert (Köln, Wien: Böhlau, 1991). “Familiale Liebe ist die wahre Gewalt.” Zur Repräsentation der Familie in Lessings dramatischem Werk” (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1988). Her articles focus on 17th and 18th century Germany and issues of gender, cultural and aesthetic representation. The have appeared in German Quarterly, Daphnis, German Studies Review, Lessing Yearbook, Text + Kritik, Seminar, Women in German Yearbook, Goethe Yearbook, Lenz Jahrbuch.  Her teaching interests include literary and cultural theories, feminist theory, women’s literature and material culture. From 2006 to 2014 she served as Dean of the College of Arts and Letters at MSU; she served as Special Advisor to the Provost on Intercultural Learning and Student Engagement (2014-2016).