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MemberUsree Bhattacharya

My research is inspired by questions of diversity, equity, and access in multilingual educational contexts, especially as they pertain to the circulation of English as a “global” language. It combines the analysis of educational policy and practice with methods from the fields of applied linguistics, second language acquisition, linguistic anthropology, and literacy studies. A primary aim of my work is to illuminate the role of discourses, ideologies, and everyday practices in the production and reproduction of hierarchical relations within educational systems. In terms of research projects, I have been conducting ethnographic research on the language and literacy socialization of young boys at an anathashram (orphanage) since 2007 in suburban New Delhi, India. A newer project examines safety and educational rights of adolescent underprivileged girls in suburban Mumbai, India.

MemberMarci McMahon

Marci R. McMahon is Associate Professor in the Literatures and Cultural Studies Department at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV), with affiliations in the Gender and Women’s Studies program and Mexican American Studies program. She previously served as the Interim Director of the Mexican American Studies Program and Center at the University of Texas Pan American (UTPA) and University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV), a bicultural and biliterate university along the US-Mexico border in South Texas and one of the largest Hispanic Serving Institutions in the nation. Her publications appear inThe Chicano Studies Reader: An Anthology of Aztlán, 3rdEdition; Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano StudiesChicana/Latina Studies: The Journal of MALCSFrontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies;Journal of Equity & Excellence in Education; and Text & Performance Quarterly.She is the author of Domestic Negotiations: Gender, Nation, and Self-Fashioning in US Mexicana and Chicana Literature and Art(Rutgers University Press, 2013), the first interdisciplinary study to explore how US Mexicana and Chicana authors and artists across different historical periods and regions use domestic space to engage with recurring debates about race, gender, and immigration. Her second book Sounding Cultural Citizenship: Latinx Dramaturgy in Times of Crises extends this focus on performance, gender, and immigration, to explore critical moments in US history when citizenship has been redefined by Latinx communities and has been in crisis; the book argues that citizenship is performed through sound, with aurality and listening as vital to performances of citizenship.

MemberLaurie Taylor

I’m the Chair of Digital Partnerships & Strategies in UF’s Libraries. I provide leadership for digital partnerships between the UF Libraries and partners across the university, regionally, nationally, and internationally. I work closely with library colleagues to create and sustain supports for collaborations for building collections, community, and capacity, including for the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and LibraryPress@UF. My work is geared towards enabling a culture of radical collaboration that values and supports diversity, equity, and inclusion.