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MemberElena Deanda

Elena Deanda-Camacho is an Associate Professor of Spanish and the Director of the Black Studies Program at Washington College. She received her BA from the University of Veracruz, Mexico, and her PhD from Vanderbilt University. Besides literature, she has studied philosophy, religion, and medieval studies in Mexico, France, and the USA.   Deanda specializes in early modern Spanish literature with an emphasis in the Spanish Enlightenment and colonial Mexico. Her research moves between medieval women’s theology and prostitution in the eighteenth century. Her scholarship and teaching practice interrogates questions about gender, race, and ethnicity; desire, sex, and love; inquisitorial censorship and freedom of speech.

MemberElizabeth Cruz Petersen

Elizabeth Cruz Petersen, Ph.D., holds a Fellow position at the Center for Body, Mind, and Culture at Florida Atlantic University, and an adjunct faculty position in the Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature. Her research is at the crossroads of cognitive studies (specifically somaesthetics) and early modern Spanish theater and literature. Focusing on the relationship between body, mind, and environment in the context of early modern Spanish performance, her book Women’s Somatic Training in Early Modern Spanish Theater (Routledge, 2016) demonstrates how the early modern Spanish actress subscribed to various somatic practices in an effort to prepare for a role. She is currently working on two research projects: The lives of five women in early modern Spanish Theater who started and ran their own theater enterprises, directing and mentoring another generation of young women entrepreneurs; and the transformation of the witch throughout literary history.

MemberFrederick A. De Armas

Early modern studies; Cervantes; Calderon; Lope de Vega; ekphrasis; the relations between the verbal and the visual particularly between Spanish literature and Italian art; the interconnections between myth and empire during the rule of the Habsburgs; the Spanish comedia and the classics; the politics of astrology; magic and the Hermetic tradition; Don Quixote and Moorish culture; Pérez Galdós, early modern Spain and Cuba.