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MemberNadia Nurhussein

My work focuses on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century African American literature and culture, especially poetry. In my first book, Rhetorics of Literacy: The Cultivation of American Dialect Poetry (The Ohio State University Press, 2013), I argued that dialect poetry functioned in the turn-of-the-century US in surprising ways, challenging readers’ expectations of a light and entertaining subgenre. My current book project considers African American literary and cultural views of the politics of imperial Ethiopia from the 1860s to the 1930s, particularly as expressed in newspapers and magazines, reflecting an interest in periodical studies that has informed my research throughout my career.

MemberAndrew Newman

Originally from Queens, NY, I’ve been teaching at Stony Brook since 2005. I’m the author of Allegories of Encounter: Colonial Literacy and Indian Captivities (2019) and On Records: Delaware Indians, Colonists, and the Media of History and Memory (2012). As a 2019 Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, I’m working on a cultural history of high school English, The High School Canon: Reading Across Generations. Please contact me at andrew.newman@stonybrook.edu.

MemberElizabeth Hutton

Lizzie Hutton is Assistant Professor of English and Director of the Howe Writing Center at Miami University, Ohio, where she works with Elizabeth Wardle. Lizzie’s current book project, Textual Transactions: Engaging Reading-Writing in Higher Education, offers an integrative theory of reading-writing for the context of the college classroom and interrogates prevailing U.S. higher education paradigms that position reading and writing as properly separable fields of study. More specifically, her book reanimates the work of Louise Rosenblatt, using Rosenblatt’s early career to make a case for a more pragmatically integrated model for building culturally sensitive literacy knowledge–including both writing studies and literary studies—in the humanities.

MemberJulia Verkholantsev

I am a scholar of cultural, religious and intellectual history, early modern and medieval literary and linguistic culture. My publications and research are concerned with the cultural space of eastern, central, and southern Europe, particularly, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Bohemia, Poland, Croatia, Hungary, and Rus. In research and teaching, I deal with topics that include the history of and approaches to language, writing, and literacy; pre-modern historical writing and historical methods; Slavic (Cyrillic, Glagolitic, and Latin) and Greek paleography and cryptography; projects and theories of universal language; and Russian medieval and modern literature and culture. As a medievalist, I am convinced that the mapping of pre-modern Europe into the modern East – West divide creates unnecessary gaps between fields of knowledge that are inherently interconnected and impedes a dialogue between scholars who find themselves working in artificially bounded sub-disciplines. In my research and professional service I try to remedy this situation. In my teaching, I examine medieval literary and historical topics in the context of modern society and help students see their importance in the development of contemporary culture, politics, and social norms. I focus on the study of reading strategies of imaginative texts that leads to the advanced understanding of literature as part of cultural history.

MemberAllison Margaret Bigelow

I study the language of colonial science and technology, mostly agriculture and metalwork. By finding texts that bridge the “trade gap” of history and literature – technical treatises, memoriales de arbitristas, legal papers – my research shows how we can unearth the rich literacies and intellectual agencies of understudied groups like women and indigenous experts.