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MemberHugh M. Richmond

I head the U.C.B. Shakespeare Program which develops audio-visual/digital materials for the teaching of Shakespeare such as the video documentaries “Shakespeare and the Globe” (distributed by Films for the Humanities),and “Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre Restored” and “Shakespeare and the Spanish Connection” (both distributed by TMW Media). In addition to the above-cited web site, “Shakespeare’s Staging,” we have also developed Milton material, such as the documentary “Milton by Himself” (Films for the Humanities) and a website: http://miltonrevealed.berkeley.edu

MemberAlbertine Fox

I am a Lecturer in French Film at the University of Bristol. I am currently working on a book project that explores ‘listening spaces’ in contemporary French and Francophone documentaries, with a focus on the documentary convention of the filmed interview. Part of this project is particularly concerned with works by the Belgian filmmaker Chantal Akerman. Other research interests that dovetail with this project include sound studies, musicology and listening, queer studies, and feminist queer theory and intersectionality. My first monograph Godard and Sound: Acoustic Innovation in the Late Films of Jean-Luc Godard was published by I.B.Tauris in 2017 and explores the relationship of sound to vision in cinema and in turn our relationship as spectators with the audiovisual in a selection of post-1979 films by Jean-Luc Godard.

MemberEduardo Ledesma

20th and 21st century Latin American (including Brazil) and Iberian literature and film. Catalan literature and film. Media and cultural studies. Modernism(s). Avant-garde and neo-avant-garde poetry. Electronic literature and new media arts (digital poetry, hypertext, blog-narratives, locative fiction, cyberculture). Documentary and experimental film. The intersection between technology and disability studies. Word and Image relations. Luso-Hispanic transatlantic connections. Intersections between engineering and culture (science and technology studies),

MemberSean Chambers, MFA

Asst. Prof. of English (Rhetoric, Literature, Creative Writing). Adviser to The VFMC Mask & Spur Drama Careers Society (JD Salinger was a member). Vice President of the Community Breakfast Collaborative of the Main Line (PO Box 135, Villanova, PA 19085). Nonfiction Books Reviewer for Booklist Magazine (Booklistonline.com). Former archivist for editor and publisher Sol Stein. Proud Valiant & Hoo. Director of the Huntington HS Oral History & Documentary Project (2021) about a seminal educational institution for African Americans in Newport News, VA, the professor’s hometown near Christopher Newport U. and Hampton University.

MemberAlison Booth

Prosopography: with IATH and Scholars’ Lab at UVA, I’m working on Collective Biographies of Women, an online bibliography and database. With Suzanne Keen, we’re developing an approach to nonfiction narrative, specifically biographies in “documentary social networks,” using a stand-aside XML schema, BESS. Always interested in books, Victorian literature, women writers and feminist studies, narrative theory. Looking for wisdom on space and narrative, word-image studies; in the DH context, this means things like Neatline and visualizations of all sorts. http://womensbios.lib.virginia.edu and http://cbw.iath.virginia.edu/cbw_db

MemberZahid R. Chaudhary

Zahid R. Chaudhary specializes in postcolonial studies, visual culture, and critical theory. His first book, Afterimage of Empire: Photography in Nineteenth-Century India, provides a historical and philosophical account of early photography in India, analyzing how aesthetic experiments in colonial photographic practice shed light on the changing nature of perception and notions of truth, memory, and embodiment. His current book project, Impunity: Notes on a Global Tendency, analyzes juridical, economic, political, and aesthetic aspects of the practices of impunity from the Cold War to the present, from postcolonial states to the United States. The book considers documentary film, contemporary art, development projects, and architecture. He has also published articles in differences, Cultural Critique, boundary 2, South Asia, and Camera Obscura.

MemberMichael Leong

My recent book, Contested Records: The Turn to Documents in Contemporary North American Poetry (University of Iowa Press, 2020), accounts for why so many contemporary poets have turned to source material, from newspapers to governmental records, as inspiration for their poetry. Synthesizing research in social ontology, cultural memory studies, art history, public sphere theory, and the history of the humanities, Contested Records argues that poems driven by the remixing and reframing of found texts powerfully engage with the collective ways we remember, forget, and remember again. Going well beyond Wordsworthian recollections in tranquility, authors of such research-driven and mnemotechnic work use previous inscriptions as a springboard into public intellectualism and social engagement. This is the first book-length study to examine conceptual writing and documentary poetry under the same cover, showing how diverse writers associated with different poetry communities have a common interest in documentation. Putting into provocative conversation writers such as Amiri Baraka, Kenneth Goldsmith, R.B. Kitaj, Mark Nowak, M. NourbeSe Philip, Vanessa Place, and Claudia Rankine, I analyze a range of twenty-first-century poems that have been reviled, celebrated, or in some cases met with equally telling indifference. In doing so, I offer nuanced and non-polemical treatments of some of the most controversial debates about race and ethnicity in twenty-first century literary culture.