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MemberStefan Herbrechter

…(2016) Narrating Life. Eds. Stefan Herbrechter and Elisabeth Friis. Leiden: Brill (Experimental Practices 1). (2015) Parallax 21.1 (special issue on ‘Deconstruction – Space – Ethics’). Eds. Stefan Herbrechter, Ivan Callus & Laurent Milesi. (2014) European Journal of English Studies 18.2 (special issue on ‘European Posthumanism’). Eds. Stefan Herbrechter, Ivan Callus, Manuela Rossini. (2013) Posthumanism – A Critical Analysis. London: Bloomsbury. (2012) ‘Posthumanism, Subjectivity, Autobiography’, Subjectivity 6 (…

English and comparative literature, critical and cultural theory, deconstruction, posthumanism, animal studies, cultural and media studies

MemberSierra Lomuto

I am an Assistant Professor of English at Macalester College, where I also hold a Consortium for Faculty Diversity Postdoctoral Fellowship (2018-2020).  My teaching and research interests focus on medieval histories of global contact and the literature they engendered; the formation of racial ideologies in the Middle Ages; and contemporary appropriations of the medieval past. I am currently working on my first book, Exotic Allies: Race, Literature, and the Construction of Mongols in Medieval Europe. I earned my Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.A. and B.A. from Mills College, and I’m a former community college student from the San Francisco Bay Area.

MemberRoger Whitson

I specialize in media theory, digital humanities, and nineteenth-century British literature. My research investigates how the Nineteenth Century is adapted, remediated, and transmitted into more contemporary art and digital media. I’ve specifically looked at this phenomenon by exploring the adaptation of William Blake and by investigating the alternate history reconstruction of the Victorian Period in steampunk. I also occasionally write about digital pedagogy.

MemberIan Cornelius

I am author of Reconstructing Alliterative Verse: The Pursuit of a Medieval Meter (2017). Details on this and other publications may be found on my personal website. My research is concentrated on the language, form, and textual transmission of medieval English poetry. I also study aspects of literary education and Latin literary culture in medieval England. I teach in the Department of English at Loyola University Chicago as Edward Surtz, S.J., Associate Professor in Medieval Literature and Culture. My current cv is posted here. The cover image is of Newberry Library, MS 10, an eleventh-century copy of Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy.

MemberAlmas Khan

As an intellectual historian, I analyze how modernism in American law and literature has shaped the quest for equal citizenship. Drawing on my Ph.D. in English and my J.D. with a focus on constitutional history, I interrogate how creative forms of legal dissent – ranging from judicial opinions to lyric poems – have sparked constitutional reimagination in the context of African American, working-class, and women’s experiences. My current book project, An Intellectual Reconstruction: American Legal Realism, Literary Realism, and the Formation of Citizenship, construes legal realism (a progenitor of critical race theory) and literary realism as a major post-Civil War movements connecting disciplinary critiques to equitist politics. I have additional interests in British literary modernism and postcolonial studies, having composed articles on Joseph Conrad’s and Virginia Woolf’s texts. My literary and legal scholarship has been published in several anthologies and journals, including Critical Insights: Social Justice and American Literature; Critical Insights: Inequality; Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History; the Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry; and the Chicago Journal of International Law. Forthcoming articles include “Black Lives Matter and Legal Reconstructions of Elegiac Forms” and “Applied Legal Storytelling: Toward a Stylistics of Embodiment.” I have also published widely on writing studies pedagogy through the lens of critical theory, drawing on extensive experiences teaching literature, law, and composition. My pedagogical scholarship has appeared in the Washburn Law JournalPerspectives: Teaching Legal Research & WritingThe Law Teacher, and the anthology Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn’t. When not immersed in literature, law, history, and philosophy, I explore modernist-inflected alternative music, fashion, interior design, landscapes, gardens, and other aesthetic phenomena suiting my fancy.