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MemberSpencer Keralis

Spencer D. C. Keralis is a scholar of the past, present, and future of the book. Dr. Keralis is the Founder and Executive Director of Digital Frontiers, a conference and community that brings together the makers and users of digital resources for humanities research, teaching, and learning. Founded in 2012, the conference celebrates it’s 8th anniversary at the University of Texas at Austin in September 2019. Dr Keralis is currently Assistant Professor and Digital Humanities Librarian with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University Library. Dr. Keralis previously served as Research Associate Professor and Head of the Digital Humanities and Collaborative Programs Unit with the Public Services Division of the University of North Texas Libraries. He also served a lecturer in the School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication at the University of Texas at Dallas, as an adjunct instructor in the UNT Department of English, and has taught in the UNT i-School. He holds a Ph.D. in English and American Literature from New York University. His research has appeared in Book History, a special issue American Periodicals on children’s periodicals, and in the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) reports The Problem of Data (2012) and Research Data Management: Principles, Practices, and Prospects (2013). Dr. Keralis’s work on labor ethics in digital humanities pedagogy is forthcoming in Disrupting the Digital Humanities, and the Modern Language Association publication Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments. Dr. Keralis has held a Mellon Fellowship at the Library Company of Philadelphia, a Legacy Fellowship at the American Antiquarian Society, a Summer Residency at the Queer Zine Archive Project, and served as a CLIR Fellow in Academic Libraries with the University of North Texas Libraries. In 2017, he was honored with the Innovative Outreach Award for the Digital Frontiers project by the Texas Digital Library.

MemberWhitney Sperrazza

I specialize in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English poetry and women’s writing, with secondary expertise in history of science. I am currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Hall Center for the Humanities, University of Kansas. In Fall 2019, I will take up a position as Assistant Professor of English at the Rochester Institute of Technology. My research explores the relationship between tangibility and intangibility. In my digital work, this relationship informs my efforts to put bodies back into data and to experiment with how technology helps us engage differently with historical literary texts. In my current book project, Perverse Intimacies: Poetry, Anatomy, and the Early Modern Female Form, I explore the heretofore undetected collisions between feminist poetic practice and Renaissance anatomical methods. Perverse Intimacies establishes early modern women writers as active interlocutors within emerging scientific discourses and offers a new definition of poetic form shaped by the informational models of early science.