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MemberThomas K. Boerigter

I am looking to research second language reading acquisition-especially intermediate Spanish. Also, I have finished a short annotated anthology of one-act plays by Emilio Carballido for intermediate/ low advanced students that needs a publisher. I would like to see models of study abroad programs with an eye toward language acquisition programs that integrate well with local organizations for service learning and/or service projects. Lastly, I would like to see models that allow for oral comprehension assessment for program curriculum development and assessment.

MemberMary Ann Tobin

Mary Ann Tobin, Ph.D., is Assistant Research Professor and Instructional Consultant with Penn State’s Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence (SITE), where she shares her expertise on classroom and course assessment techniques, student engagement techniques, outcomes-based course design and curriculum development, inclusive and equitable teaching strategies, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and other instructional matters with faculty throughout the university system. Before joining SITE in December 2016 she served as Triton College’s Director of Teaching and Learning, where she oversaw the college’s Office of Curriculum and Assessment and its Center for Teaching Excellence. There, she worked with faculty and administrators to develop student-centered pedagogy, curriculum, and assessment techniques. She has taught English composition, literature and business writing, in both traditional and online classrooms, since 1994 when she was a Teaching Fellow at Indiana State University, where she earned a Master’s Degree in English Literature. She then taught for Duquesne University, where she earned a doctoral degree. She also taught for the Community College of Allegheny County, DeVry University Online, and Triton College. Beyond her pedagogical interests, her professional interests  and scholarship include 19th-century British culture and literature, particularly the life and work of Charles Dickens, marital law and custom, and women’s education.  She has presented on these topics at national and regional conferences, and her work on them appears in Teaching Comics and Graphic Narratives: Essays on Theory, Strategy and Practice (McFarland, 2012) and Critical Insights: Great Expectations (Salem Press, 2009). Most recently, she has explored the intersections of Neo-Victorianism and innovative pedagogy as chair of a Dickens Society Sponsored Panel entitled “Neo-Dickens for a New Audience: Reading, Watching, and Teaching Dickens in the 21st Century” at the Northeast Modern Language Association’s 50th Anniversary Conference, in which she presented “A Christmas Carol: The Gift Book We Keep on Giving …  And Should Give More Often!”

MemberHeidi Bostic

Higher education leader with significant scope of responsibility. Effective leadership through change. Experience in visioning and strategic planning; fostering diversity and inclusion; financial management; advancement, fundraising and securing extramural foundation support; promoting interdisciplinary research and curriculum; community engagement and external relations; hiring, development and evaluation of faculty and staff; enrollment management; strengthening the student experience. Award-winning teacher and academic leader. Author of essays on leadership and higher education.

MemberRyan Skinnell

I am an Associate Professor of Rhetoric & Composition in the Department of English at San José State University, where I teach writing and rhetoric courses at all levels. As an Assistant Writing Program Administrator, I administer teaching associate hiring and training, program development and assessment, and faculty development. My research focuses on political rhetoric and public discourse, especially as it relates to authoritarianism, demagoguery, and extremism. I have related interests in histories of rhetoric and composition, institutional rhetorics, bureaucracy, historiography, and archival theories & methods. I have written, edited, or co-edited six books, including Conceding Composition: A Crooked History of Composition’s Institutional Fortunes (2016) and Faking the News: What Rhetoric Can Teach Us About Donald J. Trump (2018). My scholarship also appears in numerous academic journals, book collections, and popular press outlets.

MemberJane Hacking

My research interests are in the area of Second Language Acquisition, particularly L2 Phonology and the development of L2 reading, listening and speaking proficiency. I am committed to research-led teaching and also a strong proponent of community engagement and the transfer of knowledge generated within the academy to society at large. For the past few years I have worked actively with the public school system in Utah as it has rolled out school dual language immersion programs in Chinese, French, German, Portuguese, Spanish and most recently Russian. For the latter I have consulted on translation of the mathematics curriculum and selection of a literacy program from among those used in Russian primary schools. In my spare time, I ski, hike, read mystery novels and travel to challenging places.

MemberBrea Henson

Brea (Breanne) Henson is the Administrative Specialist for the Public services Division of University of North Texas Libraries. Ms. Henson assists librarians by assessment, event, instruction, and research support. Current projects that she is assisting with include an annotated bibliography on Liaison Pedagogy with Julie Leuzinger; The UNT Libraries Information Fluency Initiative Curriculum Mapping Project with Greg Hardin; Management Workshop Series for Public Services Librarians with Mary Ann Venner. She is currently working on an extensive research project, titled “Moving Toward a Praxis of Zen Librarianship: Expanding Librarianship with Mindfulness.” She presented a poster on this topic at the 2017 Texas Library Association Conference. She also continues research on Irish mythology and Celtic spirituality; pagan decadence in weird and Gothic literature; and theories related to linguistic othering, power, violence. Her aim is a humanities faculty-librarian position in the next few years.

MemberPaige Morgan

Paige Morgan is the Digital Humanities Librarian at the University of Miami. Before joining the University of Miami she held a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship at McMaster University in Ontario. She completed her PhD in English and Textual Studies at the University of Washington, where she developed the Demystifying Digital Humanities curriculum with Sarah Kremen-Hicks and Brian Gutierrez through a grant from the Simpson Center for the Humanities. Paige’s research interests include data modeling for humanities subjects, linked open data, social infrastructure for digital scholarship, emotional labor in tech contexts. She has served as a consultant and data wrangler on a variety of projects, including the CLIR microgrant project Identifying Early Modern Books (IdEMB). She teaches workshops and short courses on DH at training events such as DHSI and DH@Guelph. You can find her writing on topics related to digital humanities and libraries, as well as 18th and 19th century English poetry in journals such as Romanticism, Romantic Circles, and DH+Lib.

MemberDorin Smith

Dorin Smith is a PhD candidate in English at Brown University. His work has been published in or is forthcoming from The Henry James Review, Postmodern Culture, and ESQ. His research focuses on the intersections of the novel and history of science in the US during the long nineteenth century. Currently, he is finishing his dissertation, Fictional Brains: Reflecting on Necessity in American Naturalism, 1797-1910, a project which examines how materialist models of cognition, developed within nineteenth-century neuroscience, biology, and psychology, prefigure the formal possibilities of the novel in America to plot the contradictions of narrative reflection and storyworld necessity.