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MemberMargaret Freeman

…icon through metaphor. Poetics Today 29.2: 353-370.
 
 
 
2008   Reading readers reading a poem: From conceptual to cognitive integration, Cognitive Semiotics 2: 102-128. CSN 1400223
 
 
 
2007   Poetic iconicity. In Cognition in Language: Volume in Honour of Professor Elzbieta Tabakowska,472-501. Władyslaw Chłopicki, Andrzej Pawelec and Agnieszka Pokojska, eds.  Annual Review of Cognitive Linguistics. Kraków: Tertium. CSN 1399120
 
  
 
2007   Cognitive linguistic approaches to literary studies: State of the art in cognitive poetics. In The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics, 1821-1866. Dirk Geeraerts and Hubert Cuyckens, eds. Oxford University Press. CSN 1427409
 
 
 
2007    The fall of the wall between literary studies and linguistics: Cognitive …

  Margaret H. Freeman is Professor Emerita, Los Angeles Valley College, and co-director of Myrifield Institute for Cognition and the Arts (myrifield.org). She was a founding member and first president (1988-1992) of the Emily Dickinson International Society and moderates the monthly meetings of the Emily Dickinson Reading Circle at Myrifield in Heath, MA. She is a co-editor of the Oxford University Press series in Cognition and Poetics. Her research interests include cognitive poetics, aesthetics, linguistics, and literature. A list of her scholarly publications may be found at http://margarethfreeman.wordpress.com/publications/.  

MemberCarla Suhr

Dr. Carla Suhr joined the Spanish and Portuguese Department at UCLA in 2016 after finishing her PhD at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Professor Suhr focuses her academic work on the integration of culture, language, and cognition as a way to improve cross-cultural communication and inclusive teaching. She has worked in the field of Spanish linguistics and service-learning for the past 13 years at organizations such as Universidad Complutense de Madrid and University of New Haven, and her experience as a Spanish teacher trainer provides her the ability to implement diverse teaching strategies towards a specific project, program, and course. She cofounded IDESLI International Institute of Linguistics in San Francisco in 2009, where she directed the Language Courses and developed programs geared to industries conducting businesses with Spanish-speaking countries and professionals as well as non-profit organizations working with the Latino community. She currently teaches Spanish and Service-learning courses in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at UCLA, from which she emphasizes the positive learning outcomes attained from connecting students with the community. Learn more about these courses here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbXr-3-YXLI. Her current area of research is within the cognitive sciences, specifically on conceptualization processes and how this understanding enables us to acquire strategies as a valuable tool for Second Language Acquisition.

MemberMarc L. Greenberg

Prof. Greenberg received his MA at the University of Chicago (1984) and PhD at UCLA (1990), both in Slavic linguistics. With the guidance of mentors Henrik Birnbaum, Pavle Ivić, Ronelle Alexander, and Alan Timberlake, he studied Slavic (historical) accentology and dialectology. In 1988 to 1990 with a Fulbright-Hays Dissertation Fellowship and a grant from the US Dept. of Education he conducted fieldwork in Yugoslavia (Slovenia, Croatia) and Hungary, focusing on phonological and word-prosodic variation in Prekmurje, Porabje, and Međimurje village dialects. During this time, which coincided with the fall of socialism in Eastern Europe, he became engaged in issues of language planning in the reorganization of Yugoslavia and other-post socialist states. His research and teaching work continues to focus on diachrony and diatopy, as well as sociolinguistics. His research synthesizes techniques and learning from multiple disciplines to find novel ways of understanding and reconstructing language history, employing the comparative method, supplemented by sociolinguistics, geolinguistics, cognitive linguistics. His work mostly focused on Slavic languages and languages in contact with them (Romance, Germanic, Finno-Ugric).​ He has worked at the University of Kansas as a faculty member since 1990 and was promoted to (Full) Professor of Slavic Languages & Literatures in 2000, when he was also elected to chair of the Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures (2000–2011). He has held several administrative positions at the University of Kansas, including Acting Associate Dean for Humanities (2012), Chair-Receiver for the Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, and he is currently the founding Director, School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of Kansas (2014– ). He has held numerous prestigious fellowships, including from the National Endowment for the Humanities, American Council of Learned Societies, American Philosophical Society, US Department of Education, the Swiss Science Foundation, and the Moravian-Silesian Regional Research Fund. In 2017 he was elected to the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts as a Corresponding Member. Among his prominent and recent publications are booksThe Sociolinguistics of Slovene (as editor) (= Int’l Journal of the Sociology of Language, vol. 124, 1997); A Historical Phonology of the Slovene Language (= Historical Phonology of the Slavic Languages, vol. 13) (Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Carl Winter, 2000); A Short Reference Grammar of Slovene (= LINCOM Studies in Slavic Linguistics 30) (Munich: Lincom, 2008); articles/chapters: “Slavic” in The Indo-European Languages (London: Routledge, 2017); “Introduction” to Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics (Leiden: Brill, 2015); “The Slavic Area: Trajectories, Borders, Centres, and Peripheries in the Second World” in Globalising SociolinguisticsChallenging and Expanding Theory (London: Taylor & Francis, 2015). Editorial work: he was co-founder and co-editor (with Marko Snoj) of Slovenski jezik / Slovene Linguistic Studies (1997–2011) as well as (with Marko Jesenšek) Slavia Centralis (2008–16). In addition, Prof. Greenberg has published extensively and collaboratively on open-access issues with a focus on global equal access to research for readers and researchers. In addition to serving as General Editor of the Encyclopedia of Slavic Languages and Linguistics (Brill, est. date of publ. 2021), he serves on the editorial boards of the journals Književni jezik (Sarajevo), Naučnaja periodika: problemi i rešenija (Moscow), Voprosy onomastiki (Moscow, Ekaterinburg), Croatica et slavica iadertina (Zadar), and Lingua Montenegrina (Cetinje). As of 2018 he serves on the Commission on Language Contact, International Congress of Slavists. He serves on national and international boards including Center for Urban Language Teaching and Research, Georgia State University (Atlanta); Association for Department of Foreign Languages (New York); Gabriel Al-Salem Foundation (Florida, USA and Almaty, Kazakhstan). In addition to his academic pursuits, Prof. Greenberg plays classical guitar, Russian seven-string guitar, and renaissance lute as a soloist, duet partner, and in ensembles in the US and Europe.

MemberElizabeth Cruz Petersen

Elizabeth Cruz Petersen, Ph.D., holds a Fellow position at the Center for Body, Mind, and Culture at Florida Atlantic University, and an adjunct faculty position in the Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature. Her research is at the crossroads of cognitive studies (specifically somaesthetics) and early modern Spanish theater and literature. Focusing on the relationship between body, mind, and environment in the context of early modern Spanish performance, her book Women’s Somatic Training in Early Modern Spanish Theater (Routledge, 2016) demonstrates how the early modern Spanish actress subscribed to various somatic practices in an effort to prepare for a role. She is currently working on two research projects: The lives of five women in early modern Spanish Theater who started and ran their own theater enterprises, directing and mentoring another generation of young women entrepreneurs; and the transformation of the witch throughout literary history.

MemberKate Costello

Kate Costello is a doctoral candidate at the University of Oxford, specializing in modern Chinese literature and culture. Her doctoral thesis examines bilingualism, language games and word play in modern and contemporary experimental literature. Her research focuses on the relationship between bilingualism and linguistic experimentation, investigating the ways that multiple language competencies are deployed within a literary text. Drawing on the work of a broad range of authors that do not fit neatly into Sinophone, Francophone, or Anglophone canons, her thesis resituates these authors within a framework of interlingual writing. Paying special attention to the creative manipulation of sound, script, and syntax, her dissertation examines the playful, devious and irreverent ways that bilingual competencies manifest themselves in experimental writing. Her research interests extend to film, theatre, and text-based visual arts practices. Kate has a strong interest in linguistics and critical theory, and is co-convener of the Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation Discussion Group. She has presented papers at major international conferences including the American Comparative Literature Association annual meeting, the Modern Language Association annual convention, the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, the Association for Chinese Literature and Comparative Literature biannual conference, and the Cognitive Futures in the Humanities annual conference. Kate is also a literary translator and she has translated short stories, poems and essays by Renshun Jin, Su Xian, and Wa Lan. Her translations have appeared in Washington Square ReviewChinese Arts and Letters, the LA Review of Books China Channel, Paper Republic and Quarterly Asia, as well as the 2018 Seoul International Writer’s Festival Anthology.  

MemberElizabeth Oldfather

I am L.M. McKneeley Assistant Professor of English at the University of Louisiana at Monroe, where I specialize in British and American literature of the long eighteenth century. I work on the psychology of reading and imagination, especially experiences of literary transport, presence, and flow, which I study both historically and through cognitive and neuroaesthetic approaches.