Search

MemberAdela Ramos

I was born in Mexico City and currently live in Tacoma, WA where I am an Associate Professor of English at Pacific Lutheran University (PLU). At PLU, I teach British eighteenth-century literature, critical animal studies, environmental studies, women’s and gender studies, and border literature. In Spring 2018, I co-founded the Digital Humanities Lab with my colleague, Scott Rogers. I am an advocate for undocumented students and their right to higher education and co-founded the Undocumented Students Task Force at PLU. For my research focus, see below.

MemberMaria Quintero

Maria Quintero is a professor of English at the University of Puerto Rico where she teaches literature and writing. Her specialization is in the languages, literatures and cultures of the English-speaking Caribbean with a focus on poetry and the environment. She is the main editor of the book, Caribbean Without Borders: Beyond the Can[n]on’s Range, published by Cambridge Scholars Press, and the winner of the 2018 College English Association’s Karen Lentz Madison Award for Scholarship. Her articles and essays have appeared in numerous journals and books on the field of Caribbean Studies. She is currently working on a special topics course on the beach in Caribbean Literature.

MemberMarci McMahon

Marci R. McMahon is Associate Professor in the Literatures and Cultural Studies Department at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV), with affiliations in the Gender and Women’s Studies program and Mexican American Studies program. She previously served as the Interim Director of the Mexican American Studies Program and Center at the University of Texas Pan American (UTPA) and University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV), a bicultural and biliterate university along the US-Mexico border in South Texas and one of the largest Hispanic Serving Institutions in the nation. Her publications appear inThe Chicano Studies Reader: An Anthology of Aztlán, 3rdEdition; Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano StudiesChicana/Latina Studies: The Journal of MALCSFrontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies;Journal of Equity & Excellence in Education; and Text & Performance Quarterly.She is the author of Domestic Negotiations: Gender, Nation, and Self-Fashioning in US Mexicana and Chicana Literature and Art(Rutgers University Press, 2013), the first interdisciplinary study to explore how US Mexicana and Chicana authors and artists across different historical periods and regions use domestic space to engage with recurring debates about race, gender, and immigration. Her second book Sounding Cultural Citizenship: Latinx Dramaturgy in Times of Crises extends this focus on performance, gender, and immigration, to explore critical moments in US history when citizenship has been redefined by Latinx communities and has been in crisis; the book argues that citizenship is performed through sound, with aurality and listening as vital to performances of citizenship.

MemberAnke Finger

Anke Finger’s teaching and research focus on modernism, media studies, digital humanities, literature and other arts, aesthetics, and interculturality. Based on her early interests in art connections and multi-media, she specializes in the idea of the total artwork in modernism (Das Gesamtkunstwerk der Moderne, 2006), and she edited (with Danielle Follett) a collection of articles entitled The Aesthetics of the Total Artwork: On Borders and Fragments (2011). Her discussion of the total artwork ranges from conceptual art and atmospheres to architecture and design (The Death and Life of the Total Work of Art, 2015), including e-literature and multi-modal publishing. A co-founder and co-editor (2005-2015) of the multilingual ejournal  Flusser Studies, Anke Finger’s closely related scholarship in media studies and theory originates from her work on the Czech-Brazilian philosopher Vilém Flusser. She is co-author of the 2011 Introduction to Vilém Flusser (with shorter versions available in German and Portuguese) and serves on the advisory board of FlusserBrasil. Her latest Flusser project goes digital again, a cross-art collection composed with Scalar. The introduction to this multimodal publication is available on Vimeo. Her most recent publication in intercultural communication, a collection of essays entitled KulturConfusão: On German-Brazilian Interculturalities, was published by Walter de Gruyter in 2015. She also co-authors a blog on intercultural tool sets, “PracticingDifference,” with Manuela Wagner. Anke Finger serves as the Assistant Director of Digital Humanities and Media Studies (DHMS) at the UCONN Humanities Institute.

MemberMarco Martinez

I specialize in modern Latin American and Latinx literatures and cultures. My research and teaching interests focus on artistic displacements, cultural translation, the global circulation of the arts, and dialogues between literature, visual arts, music, and dance. My current book project, Aesthetics of Displacement: Mexican Artists in the Modern Metropolis, studies the contributions of poet José Juan Tablada, cartoonist Miguel Covarrubias, choreographer José Limón, and music theorist Carlos Chávez to New York’s modern art scene from 1920 to 1950. This study analyzes the ways in which different experiences of displacement—such as exile, migration, and foreignness—modify intellectual and artistic projects. I argue that in all four cases these experiences served to create an aesthetic of displacement, that is, an aesthetic that capitalizes on ethnic, racial, and social differences to establish cross-cultural ties between the artistic communities in both countries. By attending to their specific structures and effects and establishing an active relationship between the four different kinds of arts (literature, visual art, dance, and music), this book reflects on a socio-cultural exchange between Mexico and the U.S. that goes beyond the border, or “frontera”, paradigm. In this sense, the Mexico City-New York City connection also re-envisions the geography of international modernism and the global circulation of the arts as a process of constant displacement. In published articles and courses I have taught, I have also been working on three other lines of study. The first one considers the representation of “tipos populares” in nineteenth-century photography in Mexico, Peru, and Brazil. The second examines the political imagination of “mexicanidad” in contemporary Mexican and Chicanx graphic novels. The last one demonstrates my interest in the relationship between sport and modernity in Latin America.

MemberMarissa K. López

I am an Associate Professor of English and Chicana/o Studies at UCLA, and I study Chicanx literature from the 19th century to the present with an emphasis on 19th century Mexican California. I’ve written two books: Chicano Nations (NYU 2011) is about nationalism and Chicanx literature from the early-1800s to post-9/11; Racial Immanence (forthcoming from NYU) explores uses of the body and affect in Chicanx cultural production. My articles have appeared in leading journals such as American Literary History, Arizona Quarterly, and Áztlan (and several that don’t begin with the letter “A”).  I am the Vice President of the Latina/o Studies Association and the chair of the Modern Language Association’s prize committee for the best book in Chicana/o and Latina/o Literary and Cultural Studies.  I’m also past chair of both the MLA’s Executive Committee on Chicana/o Literature and its Committee on the Literature of People of Color of the US and Canada, and a past Director of UCLA’s Chicano Studies Research Center as well as past chair of UCLA’s Committee on Diversity and Equal Opportunity. In the English Department at UCLA I’m currently the Director of Professionalization, in which capacity I work jointly with the Director of Academic Placement to develop professionalization programs for graduate students at every stage of the PhD program.

MemberCarla Sassi

My recent research work has been devoted to re-defining Scottish studies as a ‘theoretical borderland’ in relation to the Empire and postcolonialism, as well as to map out pathways and patterns of interdisciplinary conversation across these fields. I have also researched and published widely on contemporary Scottish literature and Scottish Modernism, my main interest in the latter field being a questioning of the Anglo-American canon and a re-evaluation of the role of ‘vernacular modernisms’. Other research interests lie in the field of critical theory, with a special focus on postcolonial theories, nationalism and literature, the historical novel, border theories and, more recently, issues of canonicity and canon formation, memory studies, eocriticism/environmental studies. While I have often developed my research work in collaboration with or within Scottish institutions, I have always privileged a comparative approach, networking with colleagues from different countries and different disciplinary backgrounds. Within ESSE, I collaborated with ASLS in setting up panels focused on Scottish studies (Turin 2010, Istanbul 2012, Kosice 2014, Galway 2016). Within MLA I organised two special sessions, respectively on “Transforming the Atlantic: Caribbean-Scottish (Post)Colonial Relations” (Seattle 2012) and on “Postcolonial Celts: reframing Celticity between Otherness and Authenticity”(2014). I have been invited to speak as keynote speaker/guest lecturer at major Institutions in the UK, including the Universities of Edinburgh, Stirling, Aberdeen, Glasgow, Manchester and the Open University in London, and in other countries, including Spain, France, Germany, China, Malaysia and the US. I have also delivered the 2013 “Scottish Literature International Lecture” at the Scottish Parliament, in Edinburgh. I was a Royal Society of Edinburgh Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Stirling in 2008, Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Glasgow in 2010/2011, and Affiliate Professor at the University of Glasgow in 2016/2017. I am currently co-editing a special issue of Humanities on “Environment, Ecology, Climate and ‘Nature’ in 21st Century Scottish Literature” (forthcoming). I am a member of the steering committee of the forthcoming 2020 IASSL Conference (Prague). I have been elected Convenor of IASSL (2020-23).