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MemberWendy Laura Belcher

African language literature (especially that in Gəˁəz, Amharic, Hausa), Anglophone African literature, early African literature, African film, African women authors, history of the African book, African manuscript cultures, African female saints, and queer African studies; as well as race and gender in eighteenth-century English literature, comparative African and European studies, postcolonial literature, Chicana/o literature, African American literature, comparative hagiographies, gender and sexuality, memoir, indirection and censorship, travel literature, manuscript studies, prison literature, intellectual autobiography, and supernatural monsters.

MemberVanessa Valdés

I am the author of Diasoric Blackness: The Life and Times of Arturo Schomburg (2017) and Oshun’s Daughters: The Search for Womanhood of the Americas (2014). I am the editor of The Future Is Now: A New Look at African Diaspora Studies (2012) and Let Spirit Speak! Cultural Journeys of the African Diaspora (2012). I serve as the book review editor of sx salon, of the Small Axe Project. My research interests focus on the literatures of the African Diaspora in the Americas – U.S. Latinx and Africsn American; Hispanic Caribbean; Hispanic American and Brazilian Literatures, with an examination of constructions of race, gender, and class.

MemberLaura Helton

Laura E. Helton is Assistant Professor of Print and Material Culture in the Department of English at the University of Delaware.  Her work on African American print culture, archival studies, and public humanities has appeared or is forthcoming in PMLA, Social Text, and Southern Quarterly. Her current book project, “Collecting and Collectivity: Black Archival Publics, 1900-1950,” examines the emergence of African American archives and libraries to show how historical recuperation shaped forms of racial imagination in the early twentieth century.

MemberNadia Nurhussein

My work focuses on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century African American literature and culture, especially poetry. In my first book, Rhetorics of Literacy: The Cultivation of American Dialect Poetry (The Ohio State University Press, 2013), I argued that dialect poetry functioned in the turn-of-the-century US in surprising ways, challenging readers’ expectations of a light and entertaining subgenre. My current book project considers African American literary and cultural views of the politics of imperial Ethiopia from the 1860s to the 1930s, particularly as expressed in newspapers and magazines, reflecting an interest in periodical studies that has informed my research throughout my career.