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MemberAimee Armande Wilson

Aimee Armande Wilson is an Assistant Professor of Humanities at the University of Kansas. She is the author of Conceived in Modernism: The Aesthetics and Politics of Birth Control (Bloomsbury 2016). She specializes in twentieth century literature, particularly transatlantic modernism, feminist theory, and reproduction. Her current book project examines the relationship between writing, masculinity, and pregnancy.  ​

MemberMariela Mendez

I am an Associate Professor of Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Studies and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of Richmond. My research engages comparative literary studies and feminist and queer theories to interrogate representations of genders and sexualities in print culture throughout Latin America. In particular, I address the various ways in which women writers have used the press to craft alternative spaces of cultural, aesthetic, and political intervention that disrupt heteronormative ideologies. I teach at the intersection of Latin American Studies, Transnational Feminisms, Queer Theory, and Feminist New Materialisms, and I am also interested in the political potential of a transnational feminist critical practice.

MemberJennifer Wicke

19th, 20th, 21st century literatures; global studies; modernism and modernity studies; colonial/postcolonial/Empire studies; the novel; film, media, new media studies; critical and political theory; aesthetics and philosophy; queer and feminist theory; visual culture; the Global South; critical geography; Global Wests, American West; eco-critical studies and activism; precarity, labor, poverty, class; mass culture, TV studies; classics; the epic; Irish literature and culture; contemporary global fiction; science; mysticism.

MemberErin D. Graff Zivin

Erin Graff Zivin’s research and teaching interests focus on constructions of Jewishness and marranismo in the Luso-Hispanic Atlantic, aesthetic representations of torture and interrogation, the relationship between ethics, politics and aesthetics (particularly in the context of Latin American literary and cultural studies), and the intersection of philosophy and critical theory more broadly. She is the author of “Figurative Inquisitions: Conversion, Torture and Truth in the Luso-Hispanic Atlantic” (Northwestern University Press, 2014) and “The Wandering Signifier: Rhetoric of Jewishness in the Latin American Imaginary” (Duke University Press, 2008), and the editor of “The Ethics of Latin American Literary Criticism: Reading Otherwise” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). In addition, Graff Zivin has published articles in Modern Language Notes (MLN), SubStance, CR: The New Centennial Review, Politica Comun: A Journal of Thought, the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, Variaciones Borges, the Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies, Chasqui, the Journal of Jewish Identities and Modern Jewish Studies.

MemberHo'esta Mo'e'hahne

Ho’esta’s research examines the representational politics of Indigeneity, settler imperialism, and sexuality in North America. Ho’esta is at work on a book project that reads multi-ethnic literature, cinema, and visual and sonic cultures connected to Los Angeles and considers how the contemporary cultural politics of multi-racial, urban settler colonialism are shaped by historical and ongoing anti-Indigenous violence in the region. Ho’esta works at the intersections of Indigenous critical theory, feminist and queer theory, decolonial thought, literary, cinema, and cultural studies as well as transnational settler-colonial studies.  

MemberMarco Martinez

I specialize in modern Latin American and Latinx literatures and cultures. My research and teaching interests focus on artistic displacements, cultural translation, the global circulation of the arts, and dialogues between literature, visual arts, music, and dance. My current book project, Aesthetics of Displacement: Mexican Artists in the Modern Metropolis, studies the contributions of poet José Juan Tablada, cartoonist Miguel Covarrubias, choreographer José Limón, and music theorist Carlos Chávez to New York’s modern art scene from 1920 to 1950. This study analyzes the ways in which different experiences of displacement—such as exile, migration, and foreignness—modify intellectual and artistic projects. I argue that in all four cases these experiences served to create an aesthetic of displacement, that is, an aesthetic that capitalizes on ethnic, racial, and social differences to establish cross-cultural ties between the artistic communities in both countries. By attending to their specific structures and effects and establishing an active relationship between the four different kinds of arts (literature, visual art, dance, and music), this book reflects on a socio-cultural exchange between Mexico and the U.S. that goes beyond the border, or “frontera”, paradigm. In this sense, the Mexico City-New York City connection also re-envisions the geography of international modernism and the global circulation of the arts as a process of constant displacement. In published articles and courses I have taught, I have also been working on three other lines of study. The first one considers the representation of “tipos populares” in nineteenth-century photography in Mexico, Peru, and Brazil. The second examines the political imagination of “mexicanidad” in contemporary Mexican and Chicanx graphic novels. The last one demonstrates my interest in the relationship between sport and modernity in Latin America.