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MemberJennifer E. Nicholson

I recently submitted my PhD in the Department of English at the University of Sydney, Australia. My research projects currently span Shakespeare studies (particularly Hamlet), Montaigne, Shakespeare in translation, Renaissance books, Renaissance publication history, and world literature. I have also worked on Anglophone translations of Japanese film and my broader research interests include untranslatability and comparative translation.

MemberSarah Werner

Sarah Werner is a book historian, Shakespearean, and digital media scholar based in Washington, DC. Her latest project, Studying Early Printed Books, 1450-1800: A Practical Guide, will be published by Wiley Blackwell in the spring of 2018; the book will be accompanied by a website showcasing images of hand-press books and pedagogical resources. Werner worked for nearly a decade at the Folger Shakespeare Library as the Undergraduate Program Director and as Digital Media Strategist; in those roles she taught a regular semester-length research seminar on book history, created their research blog (The Collation), and led the overhaul of their website. She has a PhD in English from the University of Pennsylvania and is the author of numerous works on Shakespeare and performance, including Shakespeare and Feminist Performance (Routledge 2001), as well as on bibliography, digital tools, and pedagogy.

MemberHugh M. Richmond

I head the U.C.B. Shakespeare Program which develops audio-visual/digital materials for the teaching of Shakespeare such as the video documentaries “Shakespeare and the Globe” (distributed by Films for the Humanities),and “Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre Restored” and “Shakespeare and the Spanish Connection” (both distributed by TMW Media). In addition to the above-cited web site, “Shakespeare’s Staging,” we have also developed Milton material, such as the documentary “Milton by Himself” (Films for the Humanities) and a website: http://miltonrevealed.berkeley.edu

MemberSteve Mentz

Steve Mentz is Professor of English at St. John’s University in New York City. His work explores Early Modern Literature, Ecocriticism, Shakespeare, and the Blue Humanities. Most recently he is the author of Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization 1550 – 1719 (U Minn P, 2015) and co-editor of The Sea and Nineteenth-Century Anglophone Literary Culture (Routledge, 2016). He is a Series Editor for Environmental Humanities in Premodern Culture (EHPC) for Amsterdam University Press.

MemberValerie Billing

Valerie Billing is Assistant Professor of English at Central College, where she teaches courses in Shakespeare, medieval and early modern English literature, world literature, LGBTQ+ literature, and disability literature. She holds a B.A. in English Literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Early Modern English Literature from the University of California, Davis. Valerie’s current research project investigates the erotics of size in a range of early modern drama, poetry, prose, and visual art.

MemberKathryn Vomero Santos

Kathryn Vomero Santos specializes in early modern literature and culture, translation studies, and gender and sexuality studies. She is currently writing a book entitled “Babelian Performances: Early Modern Interpreters and the Theatricality of Translation,” which explores the intersections between early modern English theater and the performative practices of translating in real time between speakers of different languages in a wide range of social, cultural, economic, and political domains.   She co-edited Arthur Golding’s A Moral Fabletalk and Other Renaissance Fable Translations with Liza Blake for the MHRA Tudor & Stuart Translations Series (2017) and has published in Philological Quarterly and in a collection entitled Shakespeare and Immigration. Her public-facing writing has appeared in Shakespeare Quarterly’s new digital space and in CNN Opinion. She is currently completing essays for several forthcoming collections, including The Routledge Handbook of Shakespeare and Animals (eds. Holly Dugan and Karen Raber), Lesser Living Creatures: Insect Life in the Renaissance (eds. Keith Botelho and Joseph Campana), and Latinx Shakespeare: Performance, Appropriation, and Pedagogy (eds. Trevor Boffone, Carla Della Gatta, and Katherine Gillen). Her research and teaching have been supported by grants and fellowships from the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Huntington Library, UCLA Special Collections, the Renaissance Society of America, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She was recently elected to serve as the Translation Studies delegate for the Modern Language Association.