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MemberJulie Ward

…Asst Prof of 20th- and 21st-Century Latin American Literature…

I joined the faculty of the University of Oklahoma in 2014 as Assistant Professor of 20th- and 21st-Century Latin American Literature. I hold a PhD in Hispanic Languages and Literatures from the University of California, Berkeley (2013). My current research focuses on the representation of the real in contemporary Latin America. My publications on this topic have appeared in Theatre Journal, TransModernityLatin American Theatre ReviewThe Routledge Companion to Dramaturgy and Revista de Literatura Mexicana Contemporánea. My current book project (under contract with the University of Pittsburgh Press) is a study of how the stage has become a space for constructing alternative personal and collective histories in post-traumatic national situations, specifically in the works of Mexican theatre collective Lagartijas Tiradas al Sol. Other research interests include the digital humanities, especially for linking research and teaching; contemporary Mexican literature by women authors; and literary representations of the Mexican borders. I am motivated and encouraged by artistic expressions that provoke, contest, and offer alternatives to an often defeatist status quo.

MemberEduardo Ledesma

20th and 21st century Latin American (including Brazil) and Iberian literature and film. Catalan literature and film. Media and cultural studies. Modernism(s). Avant-garde and neo-avant-garde poetry. Electronic literature and new media arts (digital poetry, hypertext, blog-narratives, locative fiction, cyberculture). Documentary and experimental film. The intersection between technology and disability studies. Word and Image relations. Luso-Hispanic transatlantic connections. Intersections between engineering and culture (science and technology studies),

MemberLeonora Souza Paula

Leonora is an Assistant Professor in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities at Michigan State University. She specializes in twentieth and twenty first century Brazilian Literature and Culture. Her research and teaching interests include Latin American Literature and Culture, Afro-Brazilian Culture, Critical Geographies, Crime Fiction, Urban Art, Social Movements and Graphic Novels. Her current research focuses on the role of under-represented knowledge production in changing the exclusionary terrain of contemporary Brazilian culture. Her work has been published in Brazil and the United States.

MemberElena Machado Sáez

Elena Machado Sáez is a Professor of English at Bucknell University, where she teaches courses on contemporary American, US Latino/a, and Caribbean diaspora literatures. She earned her PhD in English at SUNY Stony Brook and her undergraduate degree in English at Fordham University. Dr. Machado Sáez recently completed an essay offering an MFA teleology for US Latinx literature, two essays on Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musicals, In the Heights and Hamilton, and is embarking on a research project comparing Miranda’s self-representation and modes of affiliation on Twitter to that of other Latinx writers. She is author of Market Aesthetics: The Purchase of the Past in Caribbean Diasporic Fiction (University of Virginia Press 2015). The book analyzes historical fiction by Caribbean diasporic authors in Britain, Canada and the United States as part of a global literary trend that addresses the relationship between ethnic writers and their audiences. Machado Sáez argues that the novels address the problematic of intimacy and ethics in relation to readership by focusing on how gender and sexuality represent sites of contestation in the formulation of Caribbean identity and history. Dr. Machado Sáez is also coauthor of The Latino/a Canon and the Emergence of Post-Sixties Literature (Palgrave Macmillan 2007), which discusses how Cuban-American, Dominican-American, and Puerto Rican literatures challenge established ideas about the relationship between politics and the market.

MemberKatharine Trostel

Katie Trostel earned her PhD in Literature from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She serves as Assistant Professor of English at Ursuline College where she has a special interest in Latin American women’s writing, composition, and the digital humanities. Her research project is entitled, “Memoryscapes: Women Chart the Post-Trauma City in 20th- and 21st- Century Latin America.” It examines the treatment of urban space and memories of state-sponsored violence in the works of Latin American women writers of the post-trauma or post-dictatorship generation. She analyzes a largely unexplored archive of contemporary fiction that represents public spaces in the post-trauma city, and negotiates the relationship between collective and individual memory. Her work demonstrates the central role of women in debates over the public memorialization of state-sponsored violence in Argentina (Tununa Mercado), Chile (Nona Fernández), Mexico (Ana Clavel), and Peru (Karina Pacheco Medrano), and extends theories of memory and urban space by arguing that fictional cityscapes serve as primary sites through which difficult national memories are worked through. She also serves as the coordinator of the Venice Ghetto Collaboration.

MemberTyler Bradway

I am a scholar of contemporary literature, queer studies, affect, and experimental writing. Currently, I am Assistant Professor of English and Graduate Coordinator at SUNY Cortland. I am the author of Queer Experimental Literature: The Affective Politics of Bad Reading (Palgrave, 2017) and co-editor of After Queer Studies: Literature, Theory, and Sexuality in the 21st Century (Cambridge, 2019). I guest edited “Lively Words: The Politics and Poetics of Experimental Writing,” a special issue College Literature (2019). My work has appeared or are forthcoming in venues such as GLQ, Mosaic, American Literature in Transition, 1980-1990, Postmodern Culture, Stanford Arcade, and The Comics of Alison Bechdel: From the Outside In. I am currently writing a book on queer narrative theory and co-editing, with Elizabeth Freeman, “Queer Kinship: Erotic Affinities and the Politics of Belonging” (Duke, under contract).