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MemberEduardo Ledesma

20th and 21st century Latin American (including Brazil) and Iberian literature and film. Catalan literature and film. Media and cultural studies. Modernism(s). Avant-garde and neo-avant-garde poetry. Electronic literature and new media arts (digital poetry, hypertext, blog-narratives, locative fiction, cyberculture). Documentary and experimental film. The intersection between technology and disability studies. Word and Image relations. Luso-Hispanic transatlantic connections. Intersections between engineering and culture (science and technology studies),

MemberJulie Ward

I joined the faculty of the University of Oklahoma in 2014 as Assistant Professor of 20th- and 21st-Century Latin American Literature. I hold a PhD in Hispanic Languages and Literatures from the University of California, Berkeley (2013). My current research focuses on the representation of the real in contemporary Latin America. My publications on this topic have appeared in Theatre Journal, TransModernityLatin American Theatre ReviewThe Routledge Companion to Dramaturgy and Revista de Literatura Mexicana Contemporánea. My current book project (under contract with the University of Pittsburgh Press) is a study of how the stage has become a space for constructing alternative personal and collective histories in post-traumatic national situations, specifically in the works of Mexican theatre collective Lagartijas Tiradas al Sol. Other research interests include the digital humanities, especially for linking research and teaching; contemporary Mexican literature by women authors; and literary representations of the Mexican borders. I am motivated and encouraged by artistic expressions that provoke, contest, and offer alternatives to an often defeatist status quo.

MemberMaría del Pilar Blanco

I am an Associate Professor in Spanish American Literature at the University of Oxford and Fellow and Tutor in Spanish at Trinity College in that institution. I am the author of one monograph, Ghost-Watching American Modernity: Haunting, Landscape, and the Hemispheric Imagination (Fordham, 2012), and co-editor, with Esther Peeren, of Popular Ghosts: The Haunted Spaces of Everyday Culture (Continuum, 2010) and The Spectralities Reader: Ghosts and Haunting in Contemporary Critical Theory (Bloomsbury, 2013). I am completing a second monograph project, Modernist Laboratories: Science and the Poetics of Progress in the Spanish American Fin de Siècle. With Joanna Page, I have edited a collection of essays entitled Latin America at the Vanguard: Science and its Imaginaries. I am also collaborating on a different editorial project, with Andrew Thacker and Eric Bulson:  The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Global Modernist Magazines, vol. 1: South America, Central America, and the Caribbean.  My main and current research interests are the intersections of literature and science across different traditions; popularisation of fin-de-siècle science in Latin America in periodicals and its intersections with modernismo; global modernisms; transatlantic literary relations; little magazines (1880s-mid-20th century); decadence and its global perception; life-writing

MemberKatharine Trostel

Katie Trostel earned her PhD in Literature from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She serves as Assistant Professor of English at Ursuline College where she has a special interest in Latin American women’s writing, composition, and the digital humanities. Her research project is entitled, “Memoryscapes: Women Chart the Post-Trauma City in 20th- and 21st- Century Latin America.” It examines the treatment of urban space and memories of state-sponsored violence in the works of Latin American women writers of the post-trauma or post-dictatorship generation. She analyzes a largely unexplored archive of contemporary fiction that represents public spaces in the post-trauma city, and negotiates the relationship between collective and individual memory. Her work demonstrates the central role of women in debates over the public memorialization of state-sponsored violence in Argentina (Tununa Mercado), Chile (Nona Fernández), Mexico (Ana Clavel), and Peru (Karina Pacheco Medrano), and extends theories of memory and urban space by arguing that fictional cityscapes serve as primary sites through which difficult national memories are worked through. She also serves as the coordinator of the Venice Ghetto Collaboration.