• Of Cannibals and Witches: Monstrosity and Capitalism at the Onset of Colonial Visual Culture

    Author(s):
    Gustavo Racy (see profile)
    Date:
    2023
    Group(s):
    Visual Anthropology, Visual Culture
    Subject(s):
    Cannibalism, Witches, Capitalism, Brazil
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Brazilian Visual Culture, Cannibalism, capitalism, Hexes, witches
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/438w-fb20
    Abstract:
    This article provides preliminary insight into the creation of colonial visual culture. Using visual examples, the author shows how the encounter between European and Amerindian was, at first, apparently deprived of moral judgement, later being increasingly signified through moral and physical monstrosity, especially the female body, which served as an apparatus to assure colonial dominion. Looking mostly at the works of Liègeois artist Theodor de Bry, the author shows how increasing female protagonism may have helped to coin a proper visual culture that mirrored the development of productive force in early capitalism. Assuming that the European colonizer in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries was still highly informed by Medieval culture, the author quickly retraces how the New World was imagined through cartography, following to the first depictions of the Amerindian and, finally, focusing on de Bry’s work and an argument on capitalism and how visual culture may help us understand its process.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    Attribution

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